Arteris Articles

SemiWiki: Where's the Value in Next-Gen Cars?

Bernard Murphy learns more from Kurt Shuler on the shifting landscape in the automotive electronics value chain in this new SemiWiki blog:

Where's the Value in Next-Gen Cars?

June 22th, 2020 - By Bernard Murphy

Value chains can be very robust and seemingly unbreakable – until they’re not. One we’ve taken for granted for many years is the chain for electronics systems in cars. The auto OEM, e.g. Toyota, gets electronics module from a Tier-1 supplier such as Denso. They, in turn, build their modules using chips from a semiconductor chip maker such as Renesas, who produces their chips using pre-packaged functions from IP providers like Arm. Toyota could do the whole thing themselves, but it’s very expensive to set-up and maintain all of that infrastructure. Specialization makes it all more practical. Everyone makes money doing their bit well and cost-effectively and being able to sell to multiple customers (Toyota, GM, BMW, etc.). However, that cash flow can be upended when disruptive innovations are thrown into the supply chain, in this case, a lot more intelligence and autonomy. I talked to Kurt Shuler (VP Marketing at Arteris IP) to get his view. Kurt is an IP supplier and has a unique viewpoint because he works with semis, Tier-1s and OEMs, with standard designs as well as newer AI-based designs. He’s also an active member of the ISO 26262 committee.

 

 

Topics: SoC ISO 26262 semiconductor Ncore mobileye FlexNoC autonomous driving AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect Tier 1s value-chain

Semiconductor Engineering: Interconnect Challenges Grow, Tools Lag

Benoit de Lescure, CTO at Arteris IP comments in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Interconnect Challenges Grow, Tools Lag 

June 15th, 2020 - By Brian Bailey

More data, smaller devices are hitting the limits of current technology. The fix may be expensive. 
 
Chips are growing. “Ten years ago, the interconnect would be concerned with about 10K gates,” says Benoit de Lescure, CTO for Arteris IP. “Now they need to interconnect 10M gates on a chip, so there’s been a very significant increase in complexity. The number of clients on the interconnect has increased.”
 
Topics: SoC NoC technology semiconductor engineering Benoit de Lescure CTO broadcast noc interconnect ai accelerators IP market networking chips multicast

Semiconductor Engineering: Aging Problems at 5nm and Below

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP comments in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Aging Problems at 5 nm and Below 

June 11th, 2020 - By Brian Bailey

Semiconductor aging has moved from being a foundry issue to a user problem. As we get to 5nm and below, vectorless methodologies become too inaccurate. 
 
“The problem is that if somebody is doing their own chip, their own software in their own device, they have all the information they need to know, down to the transistor level, what that duty cycle is,” says Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at  Arteris IP . “But if you are creating a chip that other people will create software for, or if you’re providing a whole SDK and they’re modifying it, then you don’t really know. Those chip vendors have to provide to their customers some means to do that analysis.”
 
Topics: SoC automotive NoC technology semiconductor engineering kurt shuler noc interconnect IP market canary cells AI algorithms

Semiconductor Engineering: Get Ready For Dynamic Extensibility

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP comments in this new  Semiconductor Engineering article:

Data Strategy Shifting Again In Cars

June 8th, 2020 - By Brian Bailey

How late can something be deferred during the development process? With dynamically extensible processors, that may be while it's operating.  
 
This places additional burdens on the algorithms. “They need something that’s much more specific for the problem they’re trying to solve, such as near real-time vision, while probably mixing that with other sensors like LiDAR and radar,” says Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “It’s not as general-purpose as something that you’d see from the more academic benchmark. So those guys are having to innovate a lot more than the traditional AI algorithms that you read about.”
 
Topics: SoC automotive ADAS NoC technology semiconductor engineering safety LIDAR kurt shuler accelerators noc interconnect IP market data flow management

Semiconductor Engineering: Data Strategy Shifting Again In Cars

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP comments in this new  Semiconductor Engineering article about a kind of balancing act which is becoming more common across the automotive design world.

Data Strategy Shifting Again In Cars

June 4th, 2020 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

How and where vehicle data gets processed continues to evolve.  
 
“We’ve been working with a Tier 1 company on ADAS and a radar chip,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “The radar chip is doing a lot of local processing. So you pick a target and classification, and most of that processing is done right there at the radar. Then you send objects to a central brain. But that radar is very complex from a digital logic standpoint.”
 
 To learn more, please download the Arteris IP FlexNoc AI Package datasheet:
 
  Download datasheet
Topics: SoC time to market automotive ADAS NoC technology semiconductor engineering safety kurt shuler noc interconnect IP market radar chip

Semiconductor Engineering: Building Your Own NoC and The Hazards of (Not) Changing

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP authored this new  Semiconductor Engineering article about the perennial challenge that all R&D organizations face.

Building Your Own NoC and The Hazards of (Not) Changing

June 4th, 2020 - By Kurt Shuler

Sometimes, designing IP in-house runs the risk of higher cost of development and being late to market.
 
It is important to keep your eye on the prize, which is to get products to market profitably and quickly with the highest possible quality and value.
 
This is especially true for make-versus-buy decisions. You make decisions and you work with those decisions, then three years later markets have changed and new requirements have risen to the top of your list of priorities. You need to have everyone working on these new high priorities; whatever slipped down the list must be outsourced. It is crucial to develop a flexible infrastructure and methodologies to respond to ever changing market requirements.
 
Note: You can download the NoC Financial Calculator referenced in the article here:
  Download NoC IP Make vs. Buy Calculator
Topics: SoC ttm time to market automotive FlexNoC NoC technology semiconductor engineering safety kurt shuler noc interconnect IP market scalability