Arteris Articles

Kurt Shuler

Kurt Shuler

Recent Posts by Kurt Shuler:

Semiconductor Engineering: ISO 26262:2018, 2nd Edition: What Changes?

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing, delivers a recent update for the ISO 26262 standard in this blog in Semiconductor Engineering;

ISO 26262:2018, 2nd Edition: What changes?

February 7th,  2019 - By Kurt Shuler

The safety standard is now clearer for IP-based designs and those happening across multiple companies.

If you’re involved somehow in design for automotive electronics, you probably have more than a cursory understanding of the ISO 26262 standard. What your organization is working from is most likely the 2011 definition. The most recent update is formally known as ISO 26262:2018, less formally as ISO 26262 2nd Edition.

Standards should evolve, but what changed and why? I’ve been a member of the ISO 26262 working group for many years, and particularly involved in how it should be interpreted for IP, and I’ve got to tell you, I have struggled. 

From my perspective, it was originally written around an implicit expectation that chips are built from scratch entirely within one organization, and this is a dated assumption. There was also not enough guidance for IP-based design or design distributed across multiple companies or sites. The workaround for an IP supplier has been to use the Safety Element out of Context (SEooC) mechanism. But this depends heavily on human interpretation, by the component vendor on what may be relevant to the integrator and vice-versa, with little guidance from the 2011 version of the standard. I complained (whined?) quite a bit to the committee about these problems and they eventually invited me to the working group. I wasn’t the only one confused and other people joined, and we seem to have had an impact; our efforts have resulted in a lot more clarification, organization and practical examples in the latest standard. I think the new Part 11 of the updated standard provides a lot more detail and useful examples for us in the semiconductor and semiconductor IP industry.

For more information about ISO 26262:2018 Part 11, download the 39-slide Arm TechCon presentation titled, “Fundamentals of ISO 26262 Part 11 for Semiconductors,” by Arteris IP Functional Safety Manager Alexis Boutillier and ResilTech Scientific Advisor Dr. Andrea Bondavalli, or watch my very popular SemiEngineering “Tech Talk: ISO 26262 Drilldown” video.

Topics: AI chips semiconductor AI automotive neural networks ML AI SoC Designers flexnoc ai package noc interconnect ISO 26262 certification

ADAS Tech Talk Video has 16,000+ views

I just found out from Semiconductor Engineering editor Ed Sperling that the most popular Tech Talk video on semiengineering.com is our Arteris IP 13 minute tutorial on ADAS. The YouTube views are almost 17,000 and Ed has stats that show that people are actually watching most of the video, not just clicking on it and moving on.

I'm glad folks have found it useful!

Topics: semiconductor engineering ISO 26262 specification tech talk video AI training

SemiWiki: Disturbances in the AI Force

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) reflects on a discussion with Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, on customer trends in design for advanced ML accelerators, why these look quite different from traditional processor architectures and the implication for design particularly around the NoC interconnect in this SemiWiki blog:

Disturbances in the AI Force

January 3rd, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

In the normal evolution of specialized hardware IP functions, initial implementations start in academic research or R&D in big semiconductor companies, motivating new ventures specializing in functions of that type, who then either build critical mass to make it as a chip or IP supplier (such as Mobileye - initially) or get sucked into a larger chip or IP supplier (such as Intel or ARM or Synopsys). That was where hardware function ultimately settled, and many still do.

But recently the gravitational pull of mega-companies has distorted this normally straightforward evolution. In cloud services this list includes Amazon, Microsoft, Baidu and others. In smartphones you have Samsung, Huawei and Apple - yep, Huawei is ahead of Apple in smartphone shipments and is gunning to be #1. These companies, neither semiconductor nor IP, are big enough to do whatever they want to grab market share. What they do to further their goals in competition with the other giants can have a major impact on the evolution path for IP suppliers.

Arteris IP is closely involved with many of these companies, from Cambricon to Huawei/HiSilicon to Baidu to emerging companies like Lynxi, offering their network on chip (NoC) solutions with the AI package allowing for architecture tuning to the special needs of high-end NN designs. Check out more here; http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package

Topics: semiwiki kurt shuler NoC semiconductor AI chips flexnoc ai package hardware ip accelerators noc interconnect

Semiconductor Engineering: Tech Talk - AI Training Chips Video

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing at Arteris IP, chat's about how to speed up algorithms and improve performance:

Tech Talk Video: AI Training Chips 


November 1,  2018 - By Ed Sperling

Ed Sperling interviews Kurt Shuler at Arteris IP headquarters about how to architect an AI training chip.

Arteris IP’s Kurt Shuler provides details about how different processing elements are used to accelerate training algorithms, and how to achieve improved performance .
Topics: tech talk video AI training AI chips semiconductor AI automotive IoT algorithms neural networks data centers