Arteris Articles

Kurt Shuler

Kurt Shuler

Recent Posts by Kurt Shuler:

Arteris IP perspective on EE Times, "Facebook Buys Interconnect IP Vendor Sonics"

Junko Yoshida from EE Times wrote an insightful article titled, "Facebook Buys Interconnect IP Vendor Sonics," that does a really good job explaining the changes in the semiconductor industry and exploring why big companies like Intel and Facebook are buying interconnect IP companies. 

Topics: acquisitions semiconductor eetimes autonomous vehicles AI SoCs facebook sonics intel

EE Times article, "AV Safety Ventures Beyond ISO 26262"

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, was interviewed and quoted in this interesting article on the new SOTIF ISO/PAS 21448:2019 specification. 

March 5, 2019 - by Junko Yoshida

Close vote
Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris, said that it was a “close vote” at the ISO 26262 meeting when the group decided to develop SOTIF as a separate standard. Skeptics questioned the need, he noted. Citing “known unknowns” and “unknown unknowns,” Shuler acknowledged, “We are getting into the realm of Donald Rumsfeld,” the former United States Secretary of Defense.

Topics: semiconductor eetimes autonomous vehicles ISO 26262 specification AI automotive design SoCs kurt shuler edge

EE Times article, IoT Was Interesting, But Follow the Money to AI Chips

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, states that the upcoming change in focus will be so radical, that by 2025, a full five sixths of the growth in semiconductors is going to be the result of AI. 

February 2, 2019 - by Kurt Shuler

A few years ago there was a lot of buzz about IoT, and indeed it continues to serve a role, but looking out to 2025 the real dollar growth for the semiconductor industry is in algorithm-specific ASICs, ASSPs, SoCs, and accelerators for Artificial Intelligence (AI), from the data center to the edge.

Anyone tracking the industry closely knows how we got to this point. Designers were implementing IoT before it even became a “thing.” Deploying sensors and communicating on a machine-to-machine level to perform data analysis and implement functions based on structural or ambient environment and other parameters just seemed like a smart thing to do. The Internet just helped to do it remotely. Then someone latched onto the term “the Internet of things” and suddenly everyone’s an IoT silicon, software, or systems player.

Topics: semiconductor eetimes autonomous vehicles AI automotive design SoCs kurt shuler training data centers edge 28 nm

Semiconductor Engineering: ISO 26262:2018, 2nd Edition: What Changes?

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing, delivers a recent update for the ISO 26262 standard in this blog in Semiconductor Engineering;

ISO 26262:2018, 2nd Edition: What changes?

February 7th,  2019 - By Kurt Shuler

The safety standard is now clearer for IP-based designs and those happening across multiple companies.

If you’re involved somehow in design for automotive electronics, you probably have more than a cursory understanding of the ISO 26262 standard. What your organization is working from is most likely the 2011 definition. The most recent update is formally known as ISO 26262:2018, less formally as ISO 26262 2nd Edition.

Standards should evolve, but what changed and why? I’ve been a member of the ISO 26262 working group for many years, and particularly involved in how it should be interpreted for IP, and I’ve got to tell you, I have struggled. 

From my perspective, it was originally written around an implicit expectation that chips are built from scratch entirely within one organization, and this is a dated assumption. There was also not enough guidance for IP-based design or design distributed across multiple companies or sites. The workaround for an IP supplier has been to use the Safety Element out of Context (SEooC) mechanism. But this depends heavily on human interpretation, by the component vendor on what may be relevant to the integrator and vice-versa, with little guidance from the 2011 version of the standard. I complained (whined?) quite a bit to the committee about these problems and they eventually invited me to the working group. I wasn’t the only one confused and other people joined, and we seem to have had an impact; our efforts have resulted in a lot more clarification, organization and practical examples in the latest standard. I think the new Part 11 of the updated standard provides a lot more detail and useful examples for us in the semiconductor and semiconductor IP industry.

For more information about ISO 26262:2018 Part 11, download the 39-slide Arm TechCon presentation titled, “Fundamentals of ISO 26262 Part 11 for Semiconductors,” by Arteris IP Functional Safety Manager Alexis Boutillier and ResilTech Scientific Advisor Dr. Andrea Bondavalli, or watch my very popular SemiEngineering “Tech Talk: ISO 26262 Drilldown” video.

Topics: semiconductor automotive neural networks ISO 26262 certification AI AI chips flexnoc ai package noc interconnect ML AI SoC Designers