Arteris Articles

Madelyn Miller

Madelyn Miller

Recent Posts by Madelyn Miller:

SemiWiki: What are SOTIF and Fail-Operational and Does This Affect You?

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, and Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) discuss Safety of the Intended Function (SOTIF) in this latest SemiWiki blog:

What are SOTIF and Fail-Operational and Does This Affect You?

May 22nd, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

Standards committees, the military and governmental organizations are drawn to acronyms as moths are drawn to a flame, though few of them seem overly concerned with the elegance or memorability of these handles. One such example is SOTIF – Safety of the Intended Function – more formally known as ISO/PAS 21448. This is a follow-on to the more familiar ISO 26262. 

When you’re zipping down a busy freeway at 70mph and a safety-critical function misbehaves, traditional corrective actions (e.g., reset the SoC) are far too clumsy and may even compound the danger. You need something the industry calls “fail operational”, an architecture in which the consequences of a failure can be safely mitigated, possibly with somewhat degraded support in a fallback state, allowing for the car to get to the side of the road and/or for the failing system to be restored to a working state. According to Kurt Shuler (Arteris VP of marketing and an ISO 26262 working group member), a good explanation of this concept is covered in ISO 26262:2018 Part 10 (chapter 12, clauses 12.1 to 12.3). The system-level details of how the car should handle failures of this type are decided by the auto OEMs (and perhaps tier 1s) and the consequences can reach all the way down into SoC design. Importantly, there are capabilities at the SoC-level that can be implemented to help enable fail operational.

For more information, please visit the Arteris IP AI package webpage: http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package

Topics: SoC semiconductor semiwiki kurt shuler flexnoc ai package ISO PAS 21448 noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448

Semiconductor Engineering: Chiplet Momentum Builds, Despite Tradeoffs

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, contributes to this latest article in Semiconductor Engineering.

Topics: SoC semiconductor engineering kurt shuler noc interconnect IP design

Semiconductor Engineering: Interconnect Prominence In Fail-Operational Architectures

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, authored this latest article in Semiconductor Engineering about moving toward "Fail Operational"

Topics: SoC automotive ADAS semiconductor engineering kurt shuler ISO PAS 21448 noc interconnect

Semiconductor Engineering: Make Your Own Energy

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, quoted in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article.

Make Your Own Energy

May 2nd, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Efficient use of power and energy in electric vehicles and smart buildings will require innovative thinking. 

Where it works
Energy harvesting has been important to automotive systems, but not necessarily at the SoC level, said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “In EV and hybrid automotive systems, regenerative braking is common and there’s efforts to harvest vibrational energy using piezoelectric transducer MEMS, but this technology will take a while to become mainstream.”

At the SoC level, the first place Arteris IP saw energy harvesting implemented was in 2014 with TI’s SimpleLink CC26xx energy-sipping IoT chips, which are designed to be powered by a separate MEMS-based power source. Even though these chips are relatively simple SoCs from a processing viewpoint, Shuler stressed that they are hugely complex from a power management standpoint. There are more than 20 different power and voltage domains along with dynamic voltage frequency scaling.

For more information, please download the Arteris FlexNoC Interconnect IP data sheet; https://www.arteris.com/download-flexnoc-datasheet

Topics: SoC automotive semiconductor engineering noc interconnect automotive systems EV hybrid