Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: How To Build An Automotive Chip

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments about the claims of technical safety requirements in this Semiconductor Engineering article;

How To Build An Automotive Chip

March 7th, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

se_logo-8Changing standards, stringent requirements and a mix of expertise make this a tough marketing to crack.

IP issues
“One of the things that all of these guys deal with is having evidence that the specifications are being followed, both from a process standpoint of how the IP is designed,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “And then, does the IP meet the technical safety requirements that are being claimed?”

This requires the IP customer to look closely at their different IP providers. “If I’m licensing some IP, I want to understand in pre-sales what do you have, how did you build it,” said Shuler. “What evidence and work products do you have to prove any claims that you make? Things may go quiet for a while until the design team gets closer to the end of the chip design project and starts doing the work where they have to calculate the diagnostic coverage and FMEDA, maybe some fault injection to validate, some of the assumptions they make in the FMEDA, among other activities.”

“If our customer or prospect has somebody who doesn’t understand functional safety or the specification, and is just going blindly through a checklist, it slows things down,” Shuler said. “So the right subject matter experts must be there.”

For more information about ISO 26262:2018 Part 11, please download this presentation "Fundamentals of ISO 26262 Part 11 for Semiconductors".

To read the entire article on the SemiEngineering page, please click here:
https://semiengineering.com/how-to-build-an-automotive-chip/

Topics: AI automotive noc interconnect functional safety RTL ISO 26262 ML/AI SoC semiconductor engineering