Arteris Articles

SemiWiki: Autonomous Driving Still Terra Incognita

A panel at Arm TechCon reviewed where we're at in self-driving. Andrew Hopkins or Arm, Kurt Shuler of Arteris IP, Martin Duncan of ST, Hideki Sugimoto of NSITEXE/DENSO and Mike Demler of The Linley Group, moderated the debated the practicalities.  Bernard Murphy of SemiWiki provides his take on the discussion in this new blog:

Autonomous Driving Still Terra Incognita

December 12th, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

I already posted on one automotive panel at this year’s Arm TechCon. A second I attended was a more open-ended discussion on where we’re really at in autonomous driving. Most of you probably agree we’ve passed the peak of the hype curve and are now into the long slog of trying to connect hope to reality. There are a lot of challenges, not all technical; this panel did a good job (IMHO) of exposing some of the tough questions and acknowledging that answers are still in short supply. I left even more convinced that autonomous driving is still a hard problem needing a lot more investment and a lot more time to work through.

You can learn more about this by downloading the Arm TechCon presentation HERE.

Topics: SoC ARM semiconductor automotive flexnoc resilience package The Linley Group automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448 UL 4600

SemiWiki: Evolving Landscape of Self-Driving Safety Standards

Think you know all about automotive safety and electronics? Think again. Bernard Murphy of SemiWiki gets an education from Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, on how the safety standards picture is becoming more complex as we factor in self-driving in this new blog:

Evolving Landscape of Self-Driving Standards

November 14th, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

I sat in a couple of panels at Arm TechCon this year, the first on how safety is evolving for platform-based architectures with a mix of safety-aware IP and the second on lessons learned in safety and particularly how the industry and standards are adapting to the larger challenges in self-driving, which obviously extend beyond the pure functional safety intent of ISO 26262. Here I want to get into some detail on this range of standards because we’re going to need to understand a lot more about these if we want to be serious about autonomous cars.

You can learn more about this by downloading the Arm TechCon presentation HERE.

Topics: SoC ARM semiconductor automotive flexnoc resilience package automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448 UL 4600

SemiWiki: Safety and Platform-Based Design

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, updates Bernard Murphy of SemiWiki on some of the ways that safety and platform-based design interact, particularly where fail-operational functionality is required in autonomous or semi-autonomous systems, in this new SemiWiki blog:

Safety and Platform-Based Design

October 22nd, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

Platform-based design, an approach to easily support multiple derivatives, opens some interesting new twists for safety-centric design. 

Bernard was at Arm TechCon as usual this year and one of the first panels he covered was close to the kickoff, hosted by Andrew Hopkins (Dir System Technology at Arm), Kurt Shuler (VP Marketing at Arteris IP) and Jens Benndorf (Managing Dir and COO at Dream Chip Technologies). The topic was implementing ISO 26262-compliant AI SoCs with Arm and Arteris IP, highly relevant since more and more of this class of SoC are appearing in cars. One thing that really stood out for me was the value of platform-based design in this area, something you might think would be old news for SoC design but which introduces some new considerations when safety becomes important.

You can learn more about this design by downloading the Arm TechCon presentation HERE.

Topics: SoC ARM semiconductor automotive automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect AI SoCs ASIL compliance

Arteris IP is Presenting at The Linley Spring Processor Conference April 10 - 11, 2019!


Don't Miss the Arteris IP Presentation on AI SoC Architectures, Thursday, April 11, 2019 

Location: Hyatt Regency, Santa Clara, CA
Session 5: SoC Design: Thursday, April 11
1:15 pm - 2:45 pm

Arteris IP presenting: "Adapting SoC Architectures for Types of Artificial-Intelligence Processing"

Come to the Linley Spring Processor Conference on April 10 - 11, 2019  - and attend the Arteris IP presentation on Thursday, April 11 during Session 5: SoC Design, were we will describe lessons learned on how to use network-on-chip (NoC) technology to efficiently implement SoC architectures targeted for different types of AI processing, including advanced techniques like when to use tiling or cache coherence, whether for edge/battery-operated or datacenter chips. 

April 11 Agenda: https://www.linleygroup.com/events/agenda.php?num=46&day=2

Topics: NoC semiconductor ArterisIP artificial intelligence SoCs edge/battery-operated cache coherence datacenter chips