Arteris Articles

SemiWiki: Intelligence in the Fog

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, and Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) discuss the hottest domains in tech today - AI and automotive in this new SemiWiki blog:

Intelligence in the Fog

June 12, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

AI is creeping into places we might not expect, such as communication infrastructure. Bernard Murphy learns from Kurt Shuler how AI and AI-centric design methods are becoming more important in this surprising domain.

By now, you should know about AI in the cloud for natural language processing, image ID, recommendation, etc, etc (thanks to Google, Facebook, AWS, Baidu and several others) and AI on the edge for collision avoidance, lane-keeping, voice recognition and many other applications. But did you know about AI in the fog? First, a credit – my reference for all this information is Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing of Arteris IP. I really like working with these guys because they keep me plugged in to two of the hottest domains in tech today – AI and automotive. That and the fact that they’re really the only game in town for a commercial NoC solution, which means that pretty much everyone in AI, ADAS and a bunch of other fields (e.g. storage) is working with them.

For more information, please visit the Arteris IP AI package webpage: http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package

Topics: SoC semiconductor automotive ADAS artificial intelligence semiwiki kurt shuler flexnoc ai package noc interconnect

Semiconductor Engineering: Interconnect Prominence In Fail-Operational Architectures

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, authored this latest article in Semiconductor Engineering about moving toward "Fail Operational"

Topics: SoC automotive ADAS semiconductor engineering kurt shuler ISO PAS 21448 noc interconnect

Semiconductor Engineering: Make Your Own Energy

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, quoted in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article.

Make Your Own Energy

May 2nd, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Efficient use of power and energy in electric vehicles and smart buildings will require innovative thinking. 

Where it works
Energy harvesting has been important to automotive systems, but not necessarily at the SoC level, said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “In EV and hybrid automotive systems, regenerative braking is common and there’s efforts to harvest vibrational energy using piezoelectric transducer MEMS, but this technology will take a while to become mainstream.”

At the SoC level, the first place Arteris IP saw energy harvesting implemented was in 2014 with TI’s SimpleLink CC26xx energy-sipping IoT chips, which are designed to be powered by a separate MEMS-based power source. Even though these chips are relatively simple SoCs from a processing viewpoint, Shuler stressed that they are hugely complex from a power management standpoint. There are more than 20 different power and voltage domains along with dynamic voltage frequency scaling.

For more information, please download the Arteris FlexNoC Interconnect IP data sheet; https://www.arteris.com/download-flexnoc-datasheet

Topics: SoC automotive semiconductor engineering noc interconnect automotive systems EV hybrid

Semiconductor Engineering: The Long and Detailed Road to Automotive Compliance

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article.

The Long and Detailed Road to Automotive Compliance

April 4th, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Bringing an engineering organization up to speed with automotive safety standards is a long and arduous process. 

Complexity on complexity
Things can get complicated very fast. Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP, said it is not uncommon in SOTIF applications to hear, “‘I’m going to do a system and it’s got cameras, and it’s got radars, and the radars have cameras, and there are sensors.’ It’s very complicated. People ask us how to protect against this and that, and how to ensure this thing works and what can be done in the interconnect to help with that. So we get pulled into these really high-level questions. And because an interconnect is configurable IP, and each customer’s design is totally different, we also get pulled into discussions around the process aspect to ISO 26262 when using configurable IP as opposed to a hard macro. These companies are asking us 1,001 questions about that, and it really is difficult. What we generally have to do is agree upfront that we are responsible for a specific part of the specification. And as a safety element out of context, we are responsible for this type of analysis and this kind of stuff; here are our assumptions of use and everything; and we agree on this. Any other insights we give to them is something we do to help them, but it’s not necessarily part of a contract or that’s required. The reason to have that agreement up front is because a lot of these companies are new to automotive, and we have a lot of experience, but we don’t want to be an ISO 26262 consultancy.”

For more information, please click and download this presentation; ISO 26262: What to expect from your chip or IP provider: https://www.arteris.com/download-iso-26262-what-to-expect-from-your-chip-or-ip-provider

Topics: SoC ISO 26262 automotive semiconductor engineering noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448