Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Racing To The Edge

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article.

Racing To The Edge

April 9th, 2019 - By Susan Rambo and Ed Sperling

The race is on to win a piece of the edge despite the fact that there is no consistent definition of where the edge begins and ends or how the various pieces will be integrated or ultimately tested.

Safety lives at the edge
“The edge includes a lot of the stuff where people are most concerned about things that can kill you, like cars and robots and medical devices,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of Arteris IP. “These things can kill you two ways. One is a cosmic ray and the traditional functional safety use case, where it flips a bit and then it goes awry. The other way is everything works as intended, however what it does and what it decides to do from its neural net application is the wrong thing. There’s not a cosmic ray. There’s not a hardware safety problem. The safety of the intended function is bad. (There is a new specification out for that, ISO/PAS 21448:2019 Road Vehicles — Safety of the Intended Functionality.)”

For more information on AI, please click on the Arteris FlexNoC AI Package webpage: http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package.

Topics: SoC ARM automotive semiconductor engineering safety noc interconnect edge ISO/PAS Intended functionality

EE Times article, "AV Safety Ventures Beyond ISO 26262"

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, was interviewed and quoted in this interesting article on the new SOTIF ISO/PAS 21448:2019 specification. 

March 5, 2019 - by Junko Yoshida

Close vote
Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris, said that it was a “close vote” at the ISO 26262 meeting when the group decided to develop SOTIF as a separate standard. Skeptics questioned the need, he noted. Citing “known unknowns” and “unknown unknowns,” Shuler acknowledged, “We are getting into the realm of Donald Rumsfeld,” the former United States Secretary of Defense.

Topics: semiconductor eetimes autonomous vehicles ISO 26262 specification AI automotive design SoCs kurt shuler edge

EE Times article, IoT Was Interesting, But Follow the Money to AI Chips

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, states that the upcoming change in focus will be so radical, that by 2025, a full five sixths of the growth in semiconductors is going to be the result of AI. 

February 2, 2019 - by Kurt Shuler

A few years ago there was a lot of buzz about IoT, and indeed it continues to serve a role, but looking out to 2025 the real dollar growth for the semiconductor industry is in algorithm-specific ASICs, ASSPs, SoCs, and accelerators for Artificial Intelligence (AI), from the data center to the edge.

Anyone tracking the industry closely knows how we got to this point. Designers were implementing IoT before it even became a “thing.” Deploying sensors and communicating on a machine-to-machine level to perform data analysis and implement functions based on structural or ambient environment and other parameters just seemed like a smart thing to do. The Internet just helped to do it remotely. Then someone latched onto the term “the Internet of things” and suddenly everyone’s an IoT silicon, software, or systems player.

Topics: semiconductor eetimes autonomous vehicles AI automotive design SoCs kurt shuler training data centers edge 28 nm