Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: The Long and Detailed Road to Automotive Compliance

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article.

The Long and Detailed Road to Automotive Compliance

April 4th, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Bringing an engineering organization up to speed with automotive safety standards is a long and arduous process. 

Complexity on complexity
Things can get complicated very fast. Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP, said it is not uncommon in SOTIF applications to hear, “‘I’m going to do a system and it’s got cameras, and it’s got radars, and the radars have cameras, and there are sensors.’ It’s very complicated. People ask us how to protect against this and that, and how to ensure this thing works and what can be done in the interconnect to help with that. So we get pulled into these really high-level questions. And because an interconnect is configurable IP, and each customer’s design is totally different, we also get pulled into discussions around the process aspect to ISO 26262 when using configurable IP as opposed to a hard macro. These companies are asking us 1,001 questions about that, and it really is difficult. What we generally have to do is agree upfront that we are responsible for a specific part of the specification. And as a safety element out of context, we are responsible for this type of analysis and this kind of stuff; here are our assumptions of use and everything; and we agree on this. Any other insights we give to them is something we do to help them, but it’s not necessarily part of a contract or that’s required. The reason to have that agreement up front is because a lot of these companies are new to automotive, and we have a lot of experience, but we don’t want to be an ISO 26262 consultancy.”

For more information, please click and download this presentation; ISO 26262: What to expect from your chip or IP provider: https://www.arteris.com/download-iso-26262-what-to-expect-from-your-chip-or-ip-provider

Topics: SoC ISO 26262 automotive semiconductor engineering noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448

Semiconductor Engineering: How To Build An Automotive Chip

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments about the claims of technical safety requirements in this Semiconductor Engineering article;

How To Build An Automotive Chip

March 7th, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Changing standards, stringent requirements and a mix of expertise make this a tough marketing to crack.

IP issues
“One of the things that all of these guys deal with is having evidence that the specifications are being followed, both from a process standpoint of how the IP is designed,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “And then, does the IP meet the technical safety requirements that are being claimed?”

This requires the IP customer to look closely at their different IP providers. “If I’m licensing some IP, I want to understand in pre-sales what do you have, how did you build it,” said Shuler. “What evidence and work products do you have to prove any claims that you make? Things may go quiet for a while until the design team gets closer to the end of the chip design project and starts doing the work where they have to calculate the diagnostic coverage and FMEDA, maybe some fault injection to validate, some of the assumptions they make in the FMEDA, among other activities.”

“If our customer or prospect has somebody who doesn’t understand functional safety or the specification, and is just going blindly through a checklist, it slows things down,” Shuler said. “So the right subject matter experts must be there.”

For more information about ISO 26262:2018 Part 11, please download this presentation "Fundamentals of ISO 26262 Part 11 for Semiconductors".

Topics: SoC functional safety ISO 26262 automotive semiconductor engineering AI RTL noc interconnect ML/AI

SemiWiki: Safety: Big Opportunity, A Long and Hard Road

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, explains the support and business cycle from the vendor to the integrator in the latest SemiWiki blog written by Bernard Murphy:

Safety: Big Opportunity, A Long and Hard Road

February 27th, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

Still think you want to sell IP into the automotive chain? Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) distills Kurt Shuler insights into what this takes. There’s certainly a lot of promise. More big chips in the central brain and in intelligent sensors together offer a lot of opportunity. The US, Europe and Israel markets are all very aggressive in developing ADAS and ML. China has been a laggard but is coming on strong and is not held back by legacy so much. They also see a big tie-in with AI where they are very strong. Kurt says there are more than a couple of hundred funded startups in automotive and AI in China.

That said, this is not an easy way to get rich. You’ll have to put a lot of investment into supporting your customers, supporting their customers and so on up to the top. The market is very dynamic, so what “done” means may not always be clear. You may not be paid for quite a long time. But if you have the grit to hang on and keep your customer happy the whole way through, you might just be successful!


 For more information, download this FlexNoC AI Package datasheet; http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package

Topics: ISO 26262 semiconductor semiwiki kurt shuler flexnoc ai package noc interconnect ML-centric design

Arm and Arteris IP present AI NPU and ISO 26262 integration together at ICCAD China

On Friday, Jerry Shu, Senior Manager for Automotive Marketing at Arm and Gary Ge, Senior Solutions Architect at Arteris IP, jointly presented "Implementing ISO 26262 Compliant AI Systems with Arm and Arteris IP" to an audience at the ICCAD China conference in Zhuhai China.

Topics: ISO 26262 FlexNoC AI AI chips Arm Cortex Arm NPU