Arteris Articles

SemiWiki: What are SOTIF and Fail-Operational and Does This Affect You?

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, and Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) discuss Safety of the Intended Function (SOTIF) in this latest SemiWiki blog:

What are SOTIF and Fail-Operational and Does This Affect You?

May 22nd, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

Standards committees, the military and governmental organizations are drawn to acronyms as moths are drawn to a flame, though few of them seem overly concerned with the elegance or memorability of these handles. One such example is SOTIF – Safety of the Intended Function – more formally known as ISO/PAS 21448. This is a follow-on to the more familiar ISO 26262. 

When you’re zipping down a busy freeway at 70mph and a safety-critical function misbehaves, traditional corrective actions (e.g., reset the SoC) are far too clumsy and may even compound the danger. You need something the industry calls “fail operational”, an architecture in which the consequences of a failure can be safely mitigated, possibly with somewhat degraded support in a fallback state, allowing for the car to get to the side of the road and/or for the failing system to be restored to a working state. According to Kurt Shuler (Arteris VP of marketing and an ISO 26262 working group member), a good explanation of this concept is covered in ISO 26262:2018 Part 10 (chapter 12, clauses 12.1 to 12.3). The system-level details of how the car should handle failures of this type are decided by the auto OEMs (and perhaps tier 1s) and the consequences can reach all the way down into SoC design. Importantly, there are capabilities at the SoC-level that can be implemented to help enable fail operational.

For more information, please visit the Arteris IP AI package webpage: http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package

Topics: SoC semiconductor semiwiki kurt shuler flexnoc ai package ISO PAS 21448 noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448

Semiconductor Engineering: Interconnect Prominence In Fail-Operational Architectures

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, authored this latest article in Semiconductor Engineering about moving toward "Fail Operational"

Topics: SoC automotive ADAS semiconductor engineering kurt shuler ISO PAS 21448 noc interconnect

Semiconductor Engineering: Using AI Data For Security

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments about the edge emerging as a particular security concern because some of the devices can kill you, covered in this Semiconductor Engineering article;

Using AI Data For Security

February 20th, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Pushing data processing to the edge has opened up new security risks, and lots of new opportunities. 

The edge and beyond
“It’s cars and robots and medical devices,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “These things can kill you two ways. A cosmic ray can cause a bit to flip, and things go awry. The other way is that the AI may work as intended, but what it decides to do from its neural net application is the wrong thing. In that case, the safety of the intended function is bad.”

There’s even a new spec just for this: “ISO/PAS 21448:2019 Road vehicles — Safety of the intended functionality.” That captures how to analyze these AI powered systems going into cars, so they works as designed.

Security can impact all of these systems. “There’s a totally separate set of specs, and a totally separate set of Ph.D. geeks working on safety and on security,” said Shuler. “What’s disconcerting is that the effects of any of these things, especially from a functional safety standpoint and a security standpoint, can be the same. Whether a bit flips or an engineer flipped a bit, someone can get hurt. Yet these sets of experts don’t really talk to each other too much. This was addressed in the new ISO 26262 2018 specification that came out in December, which includes specific text to address this. It basically says you must coordinate with security guys, but unless security is somehow mandated to a certain level — like functional safety is in cars and trains and other verticals — nobody really cares. It’s like insurance. Nobody wants to pay for too much security.”

For more information about ISO 26262:2018 Part 11, please download this presentation "Fundamentals of ISO 26262 Part 11 for Semiconductors".

Topics: semiconductor automotive AI ISO PAS 21448 data centers noc interconnect ML AI SoC Designers ecosystem

Semiconductor Engineering: Autonomous Vehicle Design Begins to Change Direction

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing at Arteris IP, comments in this Semiconductor Engineering article:

Autonomous Vehicle Design Begins To Change Direction

 

October 10th, 2018 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Topics: semiconductor semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects kurt shuler safety culture ISO PAS 21448 SOTIF autonomous car