Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Where Should Auto Sensor Data Be Processed?

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments in this latest Semiconductor Engineering article:

Where Should Auto Sensor Data Be Processed?

August 1st, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Fully autonomous vehicles are coming, but not as quickly as the initial hype would suggest...

 

Indeed, when it comes to processing the sensor data, a number of approaches currently point to allowing for scaling between different ADAS levels, but which the best way to do that is still up for debate.

“There must be an architecture they can do that with, and the question is, ‘How do you do that?'” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “There’s a lot of interest in getting more hardware accelerators to manage the communications in software, and directly managing the memory. For this, cache coherence is growing in importance. But how do you scale a cache coherent system? This must be done in an organized way, as well as adding a whole bunch of masters and slaves to it, such as additional clusters.”

For more information, please download the Arteris FlexNoC Interconnect IP data sheet; https://www.arteris.com/download-flexnoc-datasheet

Topics: SoC autonomous driving ArterisIP FlexNoC semiconductor engineering LIDAR noc interconnect cache coherence hardware accelerators

Semiconductor Engineering: Edge Complexity To Grow For 5G

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, quoted in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article:

Edge Complexity To Grow For 5G

July 2nd, 2019 - By Kevin Fogarty and Ed Sperling

Increased interdependence of technologies will drive different architectures and applications. 

It gets even more complicated in the automotive world than other any other markets because of safety-critical circuitry.

“You may have to reboot part of the chip for a failed operation, while keeping the rest of it operating in a safe state,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “If you think about the space shuttle or a Boeing 777, the black boxes are 20 pounds. You can’t have that in a car. There is a lot of functional safety being done at the microprocessor level to save cost. That can be used to spy on what’s happening at the system level, so if there are problems you can isolate them and in a safe state and fail gracefully. If there is a transient error, you reboot.”

For more information, please download the Arteris FlexNoC AI Package data sheet; http://www.arteris.com/download-flexnoc-ai-package-datasheet

Topics: SoC functional safety FPGAs semiconductor engineering flexnoc ai package noc interconnect ML

Semiconductor Engineering: Machine Learning Drives High-Level Synthesis Boom

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, quoted in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article:

Machine Learning Drives High-Level Synthesis Boom

June 6th, 2019 - By Kevin Fogarty

When a  company puts together a software/hardware design team, it's not a bad idea to make sure where the final responsibility lies.

Asking the right questions
“In China I had a long conversation with the hardware engineer about what we were trying to do, and it eventually became clear he was not the one calling the shots,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “It was the software architect calling the shots, so we all got together and that let us move forward once I realized the chip was defined by the algorithm, not the other way around.

”But the software architect doesn’t always have a good feel for the hardware. “The other problem we had was that, often, a software architect won’t be that good at abstracting down to the transistor level, and the hardware architect may not be good at abstracting up to the software, so you have to kind of walk them through that,” said Shuler.

Insisting on tight integration and optimization of software with hardware also may be a good way to coordinate development, but it doesn’t always reflect realistic performance requirements. Shuler noted that one way to help customers think about the problem is, rather than asking the hardware architect what would happen if the chip didn’t live up to expectations, to ask what the impact on the device would be if they were to remove the chip and replace it with an off-the-shelf inference chip that would have been completely generic to the application.

For more information, please download the Arteris FlexNoC Interconnect IP data sheet; https://www.arteris.com/download-flexnoc-datasheet

Topics: SoC semiconductor engineering noc interconnect ML software architects

Semiconductor Engineering: Chiplet Momentum Builds, Despite Tradeoffs

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, contributes to this latest article in Semiconductor Engineering.

Topics: SoC semiconductor engineering kurt shuler noc interconnect IP design