Latest News

EE Times article, SoC Interconnect: Don't DIY!

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, explains why a DIY approach to building your own configurable interconnect IP product is not as easy as one may think.

June 13, 2019 - by Kurt Shuler

The recent market consolidation might have some companies considering whether this is a do-it-yourself (DIY) project that your company should consider taking on. Whether it’s a simple crossbar switch or a full-function network-on-chip (NoC) architecture for advanced SoCs, all that’s needed are the right people with the right knowledge and a big budget; eventually, it could happen. But the question isn’t can you do it? It’s should you do it?

Topics: semiconductor eetimes autonomous vehicles AI automotive design SoCs kurt shuler noc interconnect ML/AI

SemiWiki: Intelligence in the Fog

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, and Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) discuss the hottest domains in tech today - AI and automotive in this new SemiWiki blog:

Intelligence in the Fog

June 12, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

AI is creeping into places we might not expect, such as communication infrastructure. Bernard Murphy learns from Kurt Shuler how AI and AI-centric design methods are becoming more important in this surprising domain.

By now, you should know about AI in the cloud for natural language processing, image ID, recommendation, etc, etc (thanks to Google, Facebook, AWS, Baidu and several others) and AI on the edge for collision avoidance, lane-keeping, voice recognition and many other applications. But did you know about AI in the fog? First, a credit – my reference for all this information is Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing of Arteris IP. I really like working with these guys because they keep me plugged in to two of the hottest domains in tech today – AI and automotive. That and the fact that they’re really the only game in town for a commercial NoC solution, which means that pretty much everyone in AI, ADAS and a bunch of other fields (e.g. storage) is working with them.

For more information, please visit the Arteris IP AI package webpage: http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package

Topics: SoC semiconductor automotive ADAS artificial intelligence semiwiki kurt shuler flexnoc ai package noc interconnect

Silicon-Proven Arteris IP Ncore ® Cache Coherent Interconnect Implemented in Toshiba ISO 26262-Compliant ADAS Chip

Toshiba tapes out next-generation automotive ADAS system-on-chip (SoC) using mature network-on-chip interconnect technology

CAMPBELL, Calif. — June. 11, 2019 — Arteris IP, the world’s leading supplier of innovative, silicon-proven network-on-chip (NoC) interconnect semiconductor intellectual property, today announced that Toshiba has taped out its next generation automotive advanced driver assistance system (ADAS) chip using the Arteris IP Ncore Cache Coherent and FlexNoC®non-coherent interconnect with the associated Resilience Package.

Our use of the uniquely flexible Ncore cache coherent interconnect IP helped us to more quickly design and implement our next generation automotive ADAS chips while allowing us to increase hardware diagnostic coverage for ISO 26262 compliance. The Arteris IP team was very helpful in guiding us on the interconnect configuration to optimize system performance and hardware diagnostic coverage using the integrated functional safety mechanisms. Working with the highly professional Arteris team and their world class interconnect IP has helped us meet our performance requirements and schedule, while adding valuable capabilities that would not be possible with other interconnects.


Nobuaki Otsuka, Technology Executive at Electronic Device & Storage Corporation, Toshiba

Topics: SoC ISO 26262 automotive semiconductors japan flexnoc resilience package ADAS cache coherent interconnect advanced driver assistance systems adas imaging processor ncore cache coherent interconnect

Semiconductor Engineering: Machine Learning Drives High-Level Synthesis Boom

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, quoted in the latest Semiconductor Engineering article:

Machine Learning Drives High-Level Synthesis Boom

June 6th, 2019 - By Kevin Fogarty

When a  company puts together a software/hardware design team, it's not a bad idea to make sure where the final responsibility lies.

Asking the right questions
“In China I had a long conversation with the hardware engineer about what we were trying to do, and it eventually became clear he was not the one calling the shots,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “It was the software architect calling the shots, so we all got together and that let us move forward once I realized the chip was defined by the algorithm, not the other way around.

”But the software architect doesn’t always have a good feel for the hardware. “The other problem we had was that, often, a software architect won’t be that good at abstracting down to the transistor level, and the hardware architect may not be good at abstracting up to the software, so you have to kind of walk them through that,” said Shuler.

Insisting on tight integration and optimization of software with hardware also may be a good way to coordinate development, but it doesn’t always reflect realistic performance requirements. Shuler noted that one way to help customers think about the problem is, rather than asking the hardware architect what would happen if the chip didn’t live up to expectations, to ask what the impact on the device would be if they were to remove the chip and replace it with an off-the-shelf inference chip that would have been completely generic to the application.

For more information, please download the Arteris FlexNoC Interconnect IP data sheet; https://www.arteris.com/download-flexnoc-datasheet

Topics: SoC semiconductor engineering noc interconnect ML software architects

SemiWiki: What are SOTIF and Fail-Operational and Does This Affect You?

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, and Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) discuss Safety of the Intended Function (SOTIF) in this latest SemiWiki blog:

What are SOTIF and Fail-Operational and Does This Affect You?

May 22nd, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

Standards committees, the military and governmental organizations are drawn to acronyms as moths are drawn to a flame, though few of them seem overly concerned with the elegance or memorability of these handles. One such example is SOTIF – Safety of the Intended Function – more formally known as ISO/PAS 21448. This is a follow-on to the more familiar ISO 26262. 

When you’re zipping down a busy freeway at 70mph and a safety-critical function misbehaves, traditional corrective actions (e.g., reset the SoC) are far too clumsy and may even compound the danger. You need something the industry calls “fail operational”, an architecture in which the consequences of a failure can be safely mitigated, possibly with somewhat degraded support in a fallback state, allowing for the car to get to the side of the road and/or for the failing system to be restored to a working state. According to Kurt Shuler (Arteris VP of marketing and an ISO 26262 working group member), a good explanation of this concept is covered in ISO 26262:2018 Part 10 (chapter 12, clauses 12.1 to 12.3). The system-level details of how the car should handle failures of this type are decided by the auto OEMs (and perhaps tier 1s) and the consequences can reach all the way down into SoC design. Importantly, there are capabilities at the SoC-level that can be implemented to help enable fail operational.

For more information, please visit the Arteris IP AI package webpage: http://www.arteris.com/flexnoc-ai-package

Topics: SoC semiconductor semiwiki kurt shuler flexnoc ai package ISO PAS 21448 noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448

Arteris IP and Wave Computing Collaborate on Reference Architecture for Enterprise Dataflow Platform

The Arteris FlexNoC Artificial Intelligence (AI) Package Coupled with Wave Computing's AI Systems and IP Technology Create a Unified Platform Optimized for AI Data Processing 

CAMPBELL, Calif. — May 21, 2019  Arteris IP, the world’s leading supplier of innovative silicon-proven network-on-chip (NoC) interconnect intellectual property (IP), and Wave Computing®, the Silicon Valley company accelerating artificial intelligence (AI) from the datacenter to the edge, are collaborating to create a blueprint that can help customers overcome compute-to-memory design challenges. Additionally, Wave Computing is licensing Arteris IP’s Ncore Cache Coherent Interconnect, FlexNoC interconnect IP, and its accompanying FlexNoC AI Package for use in the AI-enabled chips that fuel Wave Computing’s data center systems products. By working together to assimilate each other’s technology attributes, Wave Computing and Arteris can ensure the seamless flow of information enterprise-wide, helping speed time-to-insight.

Wave and Arteris have complementary compute and networking technologies that, when packaged together, address some of the key challenges facing system-on-chip designers today such as shorter product cycles and rapidly increasing product complexity. The world of AI demands greater compute power. Working with Arteris allows us to design a scalable data platform with blazing-fast performance at a cost-effective price that helps customers accelerate insight from the edge to the data center.”


Steve Brightfield, Senior Director, Strategic AI IP Marketing, Wave Computing

Topics: Arteris FlexNoC new customer artificial intelligence ncore cache coherent interconnect flexnoc ai package noc interconnect SoC designs datacenters

Arteris® IP FlexNoC® Interconnect and Resilience Package Licensed by Black Sesame for ISO 26262-Compliant AI Chips for ADAS

Mature network-on-chip interconnect technology enables smoother ASIL certification and time to market for AI-powered autonomous driving systems

CAMPBELL, Calif. May 14, 2019– Arteris IP, the leading supplier of innovative, silicon-proven network-on-chip (NoC) interconnect intellectual property, today announced that Black Sesame Technologies has licensed Arteris FlexNoC interconnect IP and the accompanying FlexNoC Resilience Package for use in its next-generation automotive advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS) that utilize advanced artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for autonomous driving capabilities.

Our new generation of autonomous driving systems require data protection within the on-chip NoC interconnect to meet ISO 26262 ASIL B functional safety requirements as well as extensive quality of service guarantees to meet the demanding needs of our AI hardware acceleration architecture. Arteris IP is the world leader in NoC interconnect technology and a pioneer in automotive and AI markets, and Arteris FlexNoC IP and the Resilience Package are helping us to more quickly develop our ISO 26262-compliant systems.”


David Zeng, VP of Engineering, Black Sesame

Topics: automotive semiconductors Arteris FlexNoC new customer flexnoc resilience package ADAS ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence

Semiconductor Engineering: Chiplet Momentum Builds, Despite Tradeoffs

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, contributes to this latest article in Semiconductor Engineering.

Topics: SoC semiconductor engineering kurt shuler noc interconnect IP design

Arteris IP FlexNoC® & Resilience Package Licensed by Semidrive for ISO 26262-Compliant Autonomous Driving Chips

Network-on-Chip technology enables functional safety and performance for highly complex automotive systems-on-chip (SoCs)

CAMPBELL, Calif. May 7, 2019– Arteris IP, the world’s leading supplier of innovative, silicon-proven network-on-chip (NoC) interconnect intellectual property, today announced that Semidrive has licensed the Arteris IP FlexNoC Interconnect and the accompanying FlexNoC Resilience Package for use in chips that are the brains in automotive autonomous driving and advanced driver assistance systems (ADAS).

Arteris IP offers us technology and expertise in both network-on-chip interconnects and functional safety. The combination of FlexNoC and the Resilience Package enables us to develop chips that not only meet our demanding requirements for performance, power consumption and die area, but also incorporate on-chip functional safety mechanisms that help us achieve ISO 26262 certification for automotive functional safety.”


Maggie Qiu, CEO, Semidrive

Topics: NoC automotive semiconductors Arteris FlexNoC new customer ADAS autonomous driving

Multiple Arteris® IP FlexNoC® Interconnect Licenses Purchased by VeriSilicon for Multiple Chip Designs

Silicon Platform as a Service (SiPaas®) pioneer standardizes on Arteris interconnect IP

CAMPBELL, Calif. April 30, 2019– Arteris IP, the world’s leading supplier of innovative, silicon-proven network-on-chip (NoC) interconnect semiconductor intellectual property, today announced that VeriSilicon has licensed Arteris FlexNoC interconnect IP as the on-chip communications backbone for use in multiple chips developed by the VeriSilicon team.

We have chosen to standardize on Arteris FlexNoC for our chip designs’ interconnect IP because we have found that it reduces our development time while allowing us to more easily implement more complex SoCs than was possible with older interconnect technologies. Using Arteris IP allows us to add value to our designs which increases the benefits we deliver to our customers, differentiates us from our competitors, and increases margins for both us and our customers. Arteris IP delivers win-win results.”


Dr. Wayne Dai, Chairman, President and Chief Executive OfficerVeriSilicon

Topics: automotive semiconductors Arteris FlexNoC new customer neural networks on-chip communications