Arteris Articles

SemiWiki: The Impact of Arteris IP and Its Partnerships on the Automotive Industry and Beyond

Podcast EP107: The Impact of Arteris IP and Its Partnerships on the Automotive Industry and Beyond

September 16, 2022 - Michal Siwinski with Daniel Nenni

Dan explores the impact Arteris is having on high-growth markets such as automotive with Michal. The company’s partnership with Arm is also explored. The impact of Arteris and its partnerships beyond the automotive market are also discussed.
 
Topics: SoC Arm NoC network-on-chip Systems-on-Chip automotive semiwiki Arteris (AIP)

Semiconductor Engineering: Time For FMEDA Reuse?

Stefano Lorenzini, Fellow & Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP authored this Semiconductor Engineering article:

Time for FMEDA Reuse?

 July 7th, 2022 - By Stefano Lorenzini

Making it easier to integrate configurable IP into safety-critical systems.

How do designers quantify safety in electronic systems? Through one or more tables called Failure Modes, Effects and Diagnostic Analysis – FMEDA. In fact, an FMEDA does not have to be a table; it could be manifested in scripts or some other form, but a table is the easiest way to think of this information. Think of an FMEDA for an IP, as the concept extends easily to a system-on-chip (SoC). The table has a row for each failure mode that the IP experts can imagine might lead to a critical safety problem. Following identifying information for that failure mode is a description of the effect – the safety problem it might cause. Through fault simulation, the safety engineer determines the likelihood of the root cause problem leading to that effect. If the likelihood is significant, the designer will propose a mitigation technique, such as a parity check to detect the problem or an error-correcting code (ECC) check to correct it. A completed FMEDA then represents a comprehensive safety quality document for that IP, a characterization that an SoC integrator can use when determining the FMEDA for the whole design.

Learn more about Arteris IP Deployment Technology Products .

 

Topics: IP System-on-Chip functional safety network-on-chip semiconductor engineering SoCs FMEDA scalability traceability Stefano Lorenzini NoCs Arteris IP (AIP)

Semiconductor Engineering: Optimizing NoC-Based Designs

Paul Graykowski, Senior Technical Marketing Manager at Arteris IP authored this Semiconductor Engineering article:

Optimizing NoC-Based Designs

May 5th, 2022 - By Paul Graykowski

Further optimization of RTL repartitioning with switching from crossbar interconnects to NoCs.

Semiconductor development is currently in a phase of rapid evolution driven by the combination of new technologies and methodologies. The technique of combining multiple functions into systems-on-chips (SoCs) is continuing to grow in complexity. Rapid advancement in new technologies for market segments like data centers, robotics, ADAS and artificial intelligence/machine learning (AI/ML) are resulting in a new breed of SoCs. These fields demand designs that are maximized for both power and performance efficiency. Designers are finding that networks-on-chip (NoCs) provide the enabling technology to meet this demand and are accelerating the move away from crossbar interconnect technology.

Learn more about Arteris IP Deployment Technology Products .

 

Topics: network-on-chip timing closure ADAS semiconductor engineering latency bandwidth SoCs congestion logic RTL data centers AI/ML NoCs floorplan Arteris IP (AIP) Paul Graykowski partitioning physical design crossbar interconnect robotics

Electronic Design Article: Making ISO 26262 Traceability Practical


This Electronic Design article, 'Making ISO 26262 Traceability Practical', covers Arteris IP's Harmony Trace in this piece authored by Paul Graykowski, Senior Technical Marketing Manager. 

March 4 , 2021 - By Paul Graykowski

The ISO 26262 standard states that functional-safety assessors should consider if requirements management, including bidirectional traceability, is adequately implemented. The standard doesn’t specify how an assessor should go about accomplishing this task. However, it’s reasonable to assume that a limited subset of connections between requirements and implementation probably doesn’t rise to the expectation.

 

For more information about Arteris Harmony Trace please visit: https://www.arteris.com/harmony-trace-design-data-intelligence

 

Topics: NoC functional safety ISO 26262 network-on-chip autonomous vehicles ip-xact SoCs AI chips EDA electronic design traceability Arteris IP (AIP) Arteris Harmony Trace Paul Graykowski HSI PLM ALM