Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Long-Haul Trucking With Fewer Drivers

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Long-Haul Trucking With Fewer Drivers

September 13th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

The economics are compelling, but technology challenges abound that are unique to this market.


Interestingly, when Intel-owned Mobileye started out with its technology, the first market was aftermarket selling to trucks. “The idea was that — and it was true — if you purchase this Mobileye system and install that in your fleet of trucks, your insurance would go down,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “That was the value proposition, and it retrofitted these capabilities onto these trucks. There’s a lot of liability with these trucks when there’s an accident. That’s why companies like FedEx Ground, and Amazon, instead of doing like UPS and saying, ‘These trucks are part of our fleet. We own them,’ they’re independent contractors. And so if your Amazon delivery or your FedEx Ground delivery crashes at FedEx, it’s the responsibility of the contractor because of the liability around that. There are incentives in the economics for these kinds of things to add the capabilities.”

Topics: automotive ADAS mobileye ArterisIP autonomous driving semiconductor engineering arteris ip SoCs kurt shuler EDA autonomous trucking

EE Times article, AI Startups Plateau, AI SoCs Soar, and the Edge Diverges

Laurent Moll, Chief Operating Officer at Arteris IP, sits down with Junko Yoshida in this new EE Times article.

May 13th, 2021 - by Junko Yoshida

Laurent Moll, chief operating officer at Arteris, predicts that in the future, “everyone has some kind of AI in their SoCs.” That is good news for Arteris, because its business is in helping companies (large and small, or new and old) integrate SoCs by providing network-on-chip (NoC) IP and IP development tools.

Topics: semiconductor ADAS eetimes AI SoCs AI chips data centers noc interconnect smartphones SoC IP hyperscalers googles TPU car OEMS edge ai

Semiconductor Engineering: Security Concerns Rise For Connected Autos

K. Charles Janac, CEO at Arteris IP is quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Security Concerns Rise For Connected Autos

April 29th, 2021 - By John Koon

Value of automotive data increases, widening the attack surface.

“We’re seeing a shift in the entire automotive industry, essentially from mechanics to electronics being the core competence of the automotive industry,” said K. Charles Janac, chairman and CEO of Arteris IP. “This includes either influence on architectures or IP design, or maybe even doing entire SoCs, by the car companies and by the Tier 1s, because you need to control your architecture in order to enforce upgradability.”

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip ADAS autonomous vehicles semiconductor engineering arteris ip K. Charles Janac interconnects 5G automotive security ISO 21434

Semiconductor Engineering: Auto OEMs Face New Competitive Threats

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Auto OEMs Face New Competitive Threats

March 4th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

EVs are creating openings for non-traditional players, creating havoc in the supply chain.

Indeed, changes in the thinking of automotive OEMs have been evident for at least the past five years, when it was clear that the OEMs intended to start making their own chips — ironically to avoid becoming “the Foxconn of cars,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “Foxconn does things to spec. But the ideas, the intellectual property, the value-added content reside outside. The ODM lives off of very tiny margins. For the Tier 1s, they’ve always been the specialist in mechanical or hydraulic, traditional automotive electronics, things like that. And now they’re seeing that they’re getting attacked from below from their own suppliers, as the chip guys — Infineon, NXP, and others — start to create reference design systems with their own silicon that can be adopted by a Tier 1. But an OEM also could buy that directly and do their own software. So the Tier 1s also are getting attacked from above by the OEMs.”

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip automotive ADAS autonomous driving semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects kurt shuler EV Tier 1s ODM