Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Sweeping Changes Ahead For Systems Design

Kurt Shuler Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Sweeping Changes Ahead For Systems Design

July 29th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Demand for faster processing with increasingly diverse applications is prompting very different models.


“It’s not about the hardware instruction set architecture,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “It’s about the software for the hardware instruction set architecture. This is why if you look at the x86 ISA, one of the reasons it’s still around today is because so much software has been created for it. With Arm, and others, you’ve had to create this stuff in it. Once it reaches a certain inflection point, things go nonlinear. I don’t know that we’re there just yet, but things are getting there. A shift is happening, and what this means, big picture, is that in terms of integration of companion chips to these x86 chips, generally they’re not in the same package because it’s an Intel chip product oftentimes going into an Intel or AMD motherboard. Then there is a PCIe card with the accelerator, so you’re kind of limited by what PCIe can give you. When things go to the Arm side, these guys aren’t just saying they’re going to have a whole bunch of Arm cores and it’s just going to be CPUs. They say, ‘We’re doing this because there are custom functions that we want to do — maybe search algorithms or otherwise that we want to do more efficiently than we can with the x86 server with a whole bunch of PCIe cards.’ They’re innovating, but they’re innovating in the chip."

Topics: ARM semiconductor engineering arteris ip SoCs datacenters NoCs RISC-V ISA hardware acceleration Von Neumann architecture ISA

SemiWiki: Autonomous Driving Still Terra Incognita

A panel at Arm TechCon reviewed where we're at in self-driving. Andrew Hopkins or Arm, Kurt Shuler of Arteris IP, Martin Duncan of ST, Hideki Sugimoto of NSITEXE/DENSO and Mike Demler of The Linley Group, moderated the debated the practicalities.  Bernard Murphy of SemiWiki provides his take on the discussion in this new blog:

Autonomous Driving Still Terra Incognita

December 12th, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

I already posted on one automotive panel at this year’s Arm TechCon. A second I attended was a more open-ended discussion on where we’re really at in autonomous driving. Most of you probably agree we’ve passed the peak of the hype curve and are now into the long slog of trying to connect hope to reality. There are a lot of challenges, not all technical; this panel did a good job (IMHO) of exposing some of the tough questions and acknowledging that answers are still in short supply. I left even more convinced that autonomous driving is still a hard problem needing a lot more investment and a lot more time to work through.

You can learn more about this by downloading the Arm TechCon presentation HERE.

Topics: SoC ARM semiconductor automotive flexnoc resilience package The Linley Group automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448 UL 4600

SemiWiki: Evolving Landscape of Self-Driving Safety Standards

Think you know all about automotive safety and electronics? Think again. Bernard Murphy of SemiWiki gets an education from Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, on how the safety standards picture is becoming more complex as we factor in self-driving in this new blog:

Evolving Landscape of Self-Driving Standards

November 14th, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

I sat in a couple of panels at Arm TechCon this year, the first on how safety is evolving for platform-based architectures with a mix of safety-aware IP and the second on lessons learned in safety and particularly how the industry and standards are adapting to the larger challenges in self-driving, which obviously extend beyond the pure functional safety intent of ISO 26262. Here I want to get into some detail on this range of standards because we’re going to need to understand a lot more about these if we want to be serious about autonomous cars.

You can learn more about this by downloading the Arm TechCon presentation HERE.

Topics: SoC ARM semiconductor automotive flexnoc resilience package automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448 UL 4600

Semiconductor Engineering: Safety Islands In Safety-Critical Hardware

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing, authored this latest article in Semiconductor Engineering, from a joint Arm, Arteris IP and Dream Chip presentation at Arm TechCon 2019:

Safety Islands In Safety Critical Hardware

November 7th, 2019 - By Kurt Shuler

Creating a reliable place to manage critical functions when a design contains a mix of ASILs.

 

Safety and security have certain aspects in common so it shouldn’t be surprising that some ideas evolving in one domain find echoes in the other. In hardware design, a significant trend has been to push security-critical functions into a hardware root-of-trust (HRoT) core, following a philosophy of putting all (or most) of those functions in one basket and watching that basket very carefully. A somewhat similar principle applies for safety islands in safety-critical designs, in this case a core which will continue to function safely under all possible circumstances. The objective is the same – a reliable center for managing critical behavior, though from there the implementation details diverge.

For more information on this presentation and to download, please go here; https://www.arteris.com/download-arm-techcon-implementing-iso-26262-compliant-ai-systems-on-chip-with-arm-arteris

Topics: SoC economics ARM ISO 26262 ASIL D semiconductor engineering arteris ip kurt shuler noc interconnect Dream Chip