Arteris Articles

SemiWiki: That Last Level Cache is Pretty Important

Bernard Murphy talked to Kurt Shuler to get an update on the Arteris IP CodaCache IP. That led to some insights not just on what has changed but also why last level cache is so important in this new SemiWiki blog:

That Last Level Cache is Pretty Important

April 21st, 2020 - By Bernard Murphy

Last-level cache seemed to me like one of those, yeah I get it, but sort of obscure technical corners that only uber-geek cache specialists would care about. Then I stumbled on an AnandTech review on the iPhone 11 Pro and Max and started to understand that this contributes to more than just engineering satisfaction.

For more information, please download this paper: https://www.arteris.com/download-technical-paper-codacache-helping-to-break-the-memory-wall

Topics: SoC ISO 26262 semiconductor ArterisIP AI semiwiki last level cache kurt shuler noc interconnect memory hierarchy Coda Cache LLC

SemiWiki: Trends in AI and Safety for Cars

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing at Arteris IP updates Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) on how trends in AI and safety are changing the design considerations for smart features in our cars in this new blog:

Trends in AI and Safety for Cars

February 3rd, 2020 - By Bernard Murphy

The potential for AI in cars, whether for driver assistance or full autonomy, has been trumpeted everywhere and continues to grow. Within the car we have vision, radar and ultrasonic sensors to detect obstacles in front, behind and to the side of the car. Outside the car, V2x promises to share real-time information between vehicles and other sources so we can see ahead of vehicles in front of us, around corners to detect hazards, and see congested traffic and emergency vehicles. Also this AI can improve on the fly, adapting to new conditions through training updates from the cloud. 

Topics: SoC semiconductor automotive automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect cache coherence SOTIF (ISO 21448 UL 4600

SemiWiki: Autonomous Driving Still Terra Incognita

A panel at Arm TechCon reviewed where we're at in self-driving. Andrew Hopkins or Arm, Kurt Shuler of Arteris IP, Martin Duncan of ST, Hideki Sugimoto of NSITEXE/DENSO and Mike Demler of The Linley Group, moderated the debated the practicalities.  Bernard Murphy of SemiWiki provides his take on the discussion in this new blog:

Autonomous Driving Still Terra Incognita

December 12th, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

I already posted on one automotive panel at this year’s Arm TechCon. A second I attended was a more open-ended discussion on where we’re really at in autonomous driving. Most of you probably agree we’ve passed the peak of the hype curve and are now into the long slog of trying to connect hope to reality. There are a lot of challenges, not all technical; this panel did a good job (IMHO) of exposing some of the tough questions and acknowledging that answers are still in short supply. I left even more convinced that autonomous driving is still a hard problem needing a lot more investment and a lot more time to work through.

You can learn more about this by downloading the Arm TechCon presentation HERE.

Topics: SoC ARM semiconductor automotive flexnoc resilience package The Linley Group automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448 UL 4600

SemiWiki: Evolving Landscape of Self-Driving Safety Standards

Think you know all about automotive safety and electronics? Think again. Bernard Murphy of SemiWiki gets an education from Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, on how the safety standards picture is becoming more complex as we factor in self-driving in this new blog:

Evolving Landscape of Self-Driving Standards

November 14th, 2019 - By Bernard Murphy

I sat in a couple of panels at Arm TechCon this year, the first on how safety is evolving for platform-based architectures with a mix of safety-aware IP and the second on lessons learned in safety and particularly how the industry and standards are adapting to the larger challenges in self-driving, which obviously extend beyond the pure functional safety intent of ISO 26262. Here I want to get into some detail on this range of standards because we’re going to need to understand a lot more about these if we want to be serious about autonomous cars.

You can learn more about this by downloading the Arm TechCon presentation HERE.

Topics: SoC ARM semiconductor automotive flexnoc resilience package automotive functional safety ArterisIP ISO 26262 compliance artificial intelligence AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448 UL 4600