Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: NoCs In Authoritative MPSoC Reference

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

NoCs In Authoritative MPSoC Reference

May 6th, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

The role of the network-on-chip in ensuring total system safety.

K. Charles Janac, president and CEO of Arteris IP, authored the first chapter in that third section on network-on-chip (NoC) architecture and how it has enabled MPSoCs. 

The chapter starts with the evolution from buses to crossbars to NoCs. Next is a useful overview of a typical approach to architecting and configuring a NoC. As the most configurable intellectual property (IP) in an SoC, getting the design to an optimal solution requires careful planning and refinement. The design evolves, not just the logic but also the topology.

By the way, this book is a technical review, not a marketing pitch. Charlie is quite open that while NoCs share some concepts with “regular” communications networks, the analogy cannot be stretched too far. NoC design is still very much an activity for semiconductor designers, not general network designers.

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety network-on-chip ECC cache coherency IEEE semiconductor engineering arteris ip ASIL D K. Charles Janac interconnects kurt shuler ai accelerators security TMR MPSOC LBIST

Semiconductor Engineering: Car Industry Changing Under The Hood

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing Arteris IP quoted in today's Semiconductor Engineering blog:

Car Industry Changing Under The Hood 

January 7th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Auto electronics are becoming more centralized, connected, and complex, and the entire supply chain is realigning around those shifts.

It wasn’t that long ago that security was viewed as something nice to have, noted Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “I’ve got some friends who are in the security IP business and I joke with them that they’re actually in the insurance business since there’s no requirement for any of this. A smartphone may be insecure, but five years after you sold the IP or the software, you’re not likely to be sued for having an insecure phone, so who cares? Cars are different. Cars have a safety of life issue, and now there are standards because of that, and it’s something being designed in upfront. Not just market forces, but also standards make things safer for everybody.”

Topics: SoC Interconnect NoC functional safety network-on-chip automotive ADAS semiconductor engineering ASIL D kurt shuler OEMs 5G security car makers

Semiconductor Engineering: The Role Of NoCs In System-Level Services

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

The Role Of NoCs In System-Level Services

September 8th, 2020 - By Kurt Shuler

The central nervous system of SoCs is expanding to help manage things like QoS and performance.

The primary objective of any network-on-chip (NoC) interconnect is to move data around a chip as efficiently as possible with as little impact as possible on design closure while meeting or exceeding key design metrics (PPA, etc.). These networks have become the central nervous system of SoCs and are starting to play a larger role in system-level services like quality of service (QoS), debug, performance analysis, safety and security because these on-chip interconnects transport and “see” most if not all of the of the on-chip dataflow. Think of the NoC as the SoC’s “all seeing eye” and you’ll have a better understanding of what is technically possible.
 
Topics: SoC NoC ISO 26262 SoC QoS automotive semiconductor engineering soc architecture ASIL D kurt shuler QoS noc interconnect IP market

Semiconductor Engineering: Virtualization In The Car

Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Virtualization In The Car

August 6th, 2020 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

How and why abstraction layers are becoming essential in automotive design.

 
“It’s a way to create multiple virtual instantiations of the same hardware, and every instance is virtually dedicated to a specific product or software or application,” said Stefano Lorenzini, functional safety manager at Arteris IP . “The hypervisor is a bare-metal operating system that runs directly on the hardware and creates an intermediate layer with respect to other application or software programs that are running on top. So if you want to look to the architecture from the top to the bottom, you see the application, then you see the hypervisor, and then you see the hardware layer. The hypervisor is the thing that creates this illusion to the application that every resource of the SoC is dedicated to them.”
 
Topics: SoC automotive autonomous vehicles NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture AI ASIL D functional safety manager noc interconnect IP market automotive electronics