Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: ISO 26262 - Law Or Framework?

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authors this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

ISO 26262 - Law or Framework?

August 9th, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

Collaboration between supplier and customer is key to achieving functional safety goals.


The ISO 26262 standard is a weighty series of documents that many believe has all the force of law or regulation; however, it is not a dictate. It is an agreement on best practices for participants in the vehicle value chain to follow to ensure safety as far as the industry understands it today. There is no monetary fine if the standard is not followed, though it will be difficult to sell automotive products without compliance.

Topics: functional safety automotive semiconductor engineering arteris ip SoCs kurt shuler eco FMEDA automotive chips IEEE P2851 ASIL automotive OEMs NoCs Accellera Functional Safety Working Group RTFM ISO 26262:2018 abstract

Semiconductor Engineering: Auto Displays: Bigger, Brighter, More Numerous

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Auto Displays: Bigger, Brighter, More Numerous

August 5th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Chips come under new scrutiny as screens become integrated into safety-critical systems.


“A lot of these companies were derived from OEMs,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “Denso, for instance, was part of Toyota before it was spun out. We are seeing differences as far as who is actually creating these chips. Is it the design team? Is it a traditional semiconductor manufacturer? Or is it a Tier 1? It may or may not be the traditional chip vendor. In Japan, there are companies like Fujitsu, and NEC that went into Panasonic, along with companies such as Denso that are designing their own chips, as well as running an IP business. There are other big players like NSITEXE [fully funded by Denso] and Renesas Electronics, the latter of which has been an incumbent in car displays for a long period of time worldwide. In Europe, companies like NXP have long been big players there, but Bosch and Continental also are creating their own chips. In every situation, there is recognition that the displays are becoming critical to the overall brain of the car, so the business is changing."

Topics: automotive ISO 26262 certification semiconductor engineering arteris ip SoCs kurt shuler ASIL-B automotive chips NoCs hardware safety requirements software safety requirements

Semiconductor Engineering: Who Owns A Car's Chip Architecture Video

Tech Talk Video: Who Owns a Car's Chip Architecture 

May 5th, 2020 - By Ed Sperling

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP, examines the competitive battle brewing between OEMs and Tier 1s over who owns the architecture of the electronic systems and the underlying chip hardware. This has become a growing point of contention as both struggle for differentiation in a market where increasingly autonomous vehicles will all behave the same way. That, in turn, has significant implications for customization and standards, as well as the hiring of chip expertise inside of these companies as companies race toward fully autonomous driving.

Topics: network-on-chip semiconductor low power ADAS tech talk video on-chip memory data centers automotive chips semiengineering

Arteris IP Presents: Lessons Learned integrating AI/ML Accelerators into Complex ISO 26262 Compliant Systems-on-Chip

This presentation titled, "Lessons Learned integrating AI/ML Accelerators into Complex ISO 26262 Compliant Systems-on-Chip," presented by Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing and Functional Safety Manager (FSM) at Arteris IP, and Diego Botero, Functional Safety Engineer at Arteris IP, to an audience at the ISO 26262 for Semiconductors (Munich) Conference.

Topics: functional safety ISO 26262 Systems-on-Chip FlexNoC kurt shuler accelerators ML/AI automotive chips IQPC