Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Auto OEMs Face New Competitive Threats

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Auto OEMs Face New Competitive Threats

March 4th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

EVs are creating openings for non-traditional players, creating havoc in the supply chain.

Indeed, changes in the thinking of automotive OEMs have been evident for at least the past five years, when it was clear that the OEMs intended to start making their own chips — ironically to avoid becoming “the Foxconn of cars,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “Foxconn does things to spec. But the ideas, the intellectual property, the value-added content reside outside. The ODM lives off of very tiny margins. For the Tier 1s, they’ve always been the specialist in mechanical or hydraulic, traditional automotive electronics, things like that. And now they’re seeing that they’re getting attacked from below from their own suppliers, as the chip guys — Infineon, NXP, and others — start to create reference design systems with their own silicon that can be adopted by a Tier 1. But an OEM also could buy that directly and do their own software. So the Tier 1s also are getting attacked from above by the OEMs.”

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip automotive ADAS autonomous driving semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects kurt shuler EV Tier 1s ODM

SemiWiki: Where's the Value in Next-Gen Cars?

Bernard Murphy learns more from Kurt Shuler on the shifting landscape in the automotive electronics value chain in this new SemiWiki blog:

Where's the Value in Next-Gen Cars?

June 22th, 2020 - By Bernard Murphy

Value chains can be very robust and seemingly unbreakable – until they’re not. One we’ve taken for granted for many years is the chain for electronics systems in cars. The auto OEM, e.g. Toyota, gets electronics module from a Tier-1 supplier such as Denso. They, in turn, build their modules using chips from a semiconductor chip maker such as Renesas, who produces their chips using pre-packaged functions from IP providers like Arm. Toyota could do the whole thing themselves, but it’s very expensive to set-up and maintain all of that infrastructure. Specialization makes it all more practical. Everyone makes money doing their bit well and cost-effectively and being able to sell to multiple customers (Toyota, GM, BMW, etc.). However, that cash flow can be upended when disruptive innovations are thrown into the supply chain, in this case, a lot more intelligence and autonomy. I talked to Kurt Shuler (VP Marketing at Arteris IP) to get his view. Kurt is an IP supplier and has a unique viewpoint because he works with semis, Tier-1s and OEMs, with standard designs as well as newer AI-based designs. He’s also an active member of the ISO 26262 committee.

 

 

Topics: SoC ISO 26262 semiconductor Ncore mobileye FlexNoC autonomous driving AI semiwiki kurt shuler noc interconnect Tier 1s value-chain

SemiWiki: Design in the Time of COVID

Bernard Murphy gets an update Kurt Shuler on possible new challenges in this new world and why now might be a good time to rethink some of those in-house IP projects, particularly the NoC in this new SemiWiki blog:

Design in the Time of COVID

May 26th, 2020 - By Bernard Murphy

There’s a lot of debate about how and when we are going to emerge from the worldwide economic downturn triggered by the pandemic. Everyone agrees we will emerge. This isn’t humanity’s first pandemic, nor will it be our last. But do we come out quickly or slowly? And what does the economy look like on the other side, particularly for the domain we care about – electronic design?

 

Topics: SoC semiconductor Ncore FlexNoC autonomous driving AI semiwiki kurt shuler data centers noc interconnect on-chip communications electronic design

EE Times article, The Age of the Monster Chip

K. Charles Janac, President and CEO, at Arteris IP, authored this article on what is now defined as a "Monster Chip".

September 19, 2019 - by K. Charles Janac

What are the system designs that require a leap in SoC complexity? It’s not only big datacenter artificial intelligence (AI) chips, but also autonomous vehicles such as cars, trucks and drones; they are self-landing, reusable rockets; they are medical devices carrying out remote diagnostics; and they are connected machine tool controllers supporting smart manufacturing.

These chips are starting to be referred to as “Monster Chips” because of both the size and complexity.

Topics: semiconductor ADAS eetimes autonomous driving AI K. Charles Janac SoCs noc interconnect data center automation blockchain big chips