Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Long-Haul Trucking With Fewer Drivers

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Long-Haul Trucking With Fewer Drivers

September 13th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

The economics are compelling, but technology challenges abound that are unique to this market.


Interestingly, when Intel-owned Mobileye started out with its technology, the first market was aftermarket selling to trucks. “The idea was that — and it was true — if you purchase this Mobileye system and install that in your fleet of trucks, your insurance would go down,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “That was the value proposition, and it retrofitted these capabilities onto these trucks. There’s a lot of liability with these trucks when there’s an accident. That’s why companies like FedEx Ground, and Amazon, instead of doing like UPS and saying, ‘These trucks are part of our fleet. We own them,’ they’re independent contractors. And so if your Amazon delivery or your FedEx Ground delivery crashes at FedEx, it’s the responsibility of the contractor because of the liability around that. There are incentives in the economics for these kinds of things to add the capabilities.”

Topics: automotive ADAS mobileye ArterisIP autonomous driving semiconductor engineering arteris ip SoCs kurt shuler EDA autonomous trucking