Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Maximizing Value Post-Moore's Law

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Maximizing Value Post-Moore's Law

July 13th, 2020 - By Brian Bailey

The value of a semiconductor can be difficult to measure because it involves costs and benefits over time. As market segments feel different pressures, maximizing value is going in several directions. 

 
“Assessing value is really hard because it is over the lifetime,” says Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “A lot of chips are disposable. Consider your cell phone. You don’t really care if it’s working 10 years from now. For the data center guys and the AI chips, it’s the same thing. Certain industries do want that chip to last for 15 or 20 years, and that’s automotive, industrial — those kinds of things where there’s a huge capital cost component to that piece of equipment and people are not going to be throwing it away.
 
Topics: SoC IoT ADAS NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture AI kurt shuler data centers noc interconnect IP market chip costs

SemiWiki: Design in the Time of COVID

Bernard Murphy gets an update Kurt Shuler on possible new challenges in this new world and why now might be a good time to rethink some of those in-house IP projects, particularly the NoC in this new SemiWiki blog:

Design in the Time of COVID

May 26th, 2020 - By Bernard Murphy

There’s a lot of debate about how and when we are going to emerge from the worldwide economic downturn triggered by the pandemic. Everyone agrees we will emerge. This isn’t humanity’s first pandemic, nor will it be our last. But do we come out quickly or slowly? And what does the economy look like on the other side, particularly for the domain we care about – electronic design?

 

Topics: SoC semiconductor Ncore FlexNoC autonomous driving AI semiwiki kurt shuler data centers noc interconnect on-chip communications electronic design

Semiconductor Engineering: Vehicle Communications Is Due For An Overhaul

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Vehicle Communications Is Due For An Overhaul

May 12th, 2020 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

The Controller Area Network (CAN), one of the main communications networks in an automobile, is headed for a security overhaul — if not a wholesale replacement.
 
Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at  Arteris IP , likewise stressed the need for am architecture for security from the start. “Do as much as you can at the lowest possible level, because that’s where you can have the most control later. If you’re doing everything in software later, there are still ways around that. If you have things at the hardware level — and that’s where it comes to with the interconnects and the firewalls — if you have the physical mechanisms to stop traffic that shouldn’t be there during certain use cases and you can control that later when there’s new use cases, you’re covered. But it’s got to be built in an overall architecture, where the smallest parts are the SoC transistors. This equates to fire-walling, and either poisoning data that is suspect and letting it through or firing an interrupt up to the system that says, ‘Hey, I’m being hacked.’”
 
Topics: SoC automotive NoC technology semiconductor engineering kurt shuler data centers noc interconnect IP market security CAN BUS SoC transistors

Semiconductor Engineering: Which Chip Interconnect Protocol is Better?

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP participates in this Experts at the Table with Ed Sperling in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Which Chip Interconnect Protocol is Better?

May 11th, 2020 - By Ed Sperling

Experts at the Table: CXL and CCIX are different but it's not always clear which is the best choice.
 
"Everybody is circling around and trying to figure out what everybody else is doing, said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. CCIX is a little different. The idea there was that you would have one or more chips and they would all be one cache coherent system. So in the case of CXL, the coherency is all managed on the Xeon side, and that companion chip is always a slave. It’s different with CCIX. So if you do the bi-directional coherency, which is what people are interested in, it’s one big cache-coherent system".
 
To learn more, please click here for the Tech Talk CXL vs. CCIX video: https://www.arteris.com/blog/semiconductor-engineering-cxl-vs.-ccix-video 
 
Topics: SoC automotive CCIX NoC technology semiconductor engineering tech talk video kurt shuler data centers noc interconnect CXL IP market