Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Who Owns A Car's Chip Architecture Video

Tech Talk Video: Who Owns a Car's Chip Architecture 

May 5th, 2020 - By Ed Sperling

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP, examines the competitive battle brewing between OEMs and Tier 1s over who owns the architecture of the electronic systems and the underlying chip hardware. This has become a growing point of contention as both struggle for differentiation in a market where increasingly autonomous vehicles will all behave the same way. That, in turn, has significant implications for customization and standards, as well as the hiring of chip expertise inside of these companies as companies race toward fully autonomous driving.

Topics: network-on-chip semiconductor low power ADAS tech talk video on-chip memory data centers automotive chips semiengineering

Semiconductor Engineering: Key Drivers in New Chip Industry Outlook

K. Charles Janac, chairman and CEO at Arteris IP is quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Key Drivers in New Chip Industry Outlook

May 4th, 2020 - By Ed Sperling

CEOs and analysts examine winners and losers and where demand is shifting.
 
“Opinions are all over the place,” said K. Charles Janac, chairman and CEO of Arteris IP . “If you look at high tech, about 60% of the segments are down, 40% are up. What’s up is infrastructure, which includes data centers, networking, cameras, security, entertainment and video games. What’s down are the end points — smart phones, cars, some consumer, industrial and automotive. The big question is whether this is due to the pandemic and overreaction, or whether this is going to be a debt-driving mainstream crisis.”
 
Topics: SoC automotive NoC technology semiconductor engineering K. Charles Janac data centers noc interconnect IP market covid-19 smart phones

Semiconductor Engineering: Last-Level Cache Video

Tech Talk Video: Last-Level Cache 

April 6th, 2020 - By Ed Sperling

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP, explains how to reduce latency and improve performance with last-level cache in order to avoid sending large amounts of data to external memory, and how to ensure quality of service on a chip by taking into account contention for resources.

Topics: network-on-chip semiconductor CodaCache tech talk video on-chip memory data centers memory hierarchy semiengineering

Semiconductor Engineering: Using AI Data For Security

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments about the edge emerging as a particular security concern because some of the devices can kill you, covered in this Semiconductor Engineering article;

Using AI Data For Security

February 20th, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Pushing data processing to the edge has opened up new security risks, and lots of new opportunities. 

The edge and beyond
“It’s cars and robots and medical devices,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “These things can kill you two ways. A cosmic ray can cause a bit to flip, and things go awry. The other way is that the AI may work as intended, but what it decides to do from its neural net application is the wrong thing. In that case, the safety of the intended function is bad.”

There’s even a new spec just for this: “ISO/PAS 21448:2019 Road vehicles — Safety of the intended functionality.” That captures how to analyze these AI powered systems going into cars, so they works as designed.

Security can impact all of these systems. “There’s a totally separate set of specs, and a totally separate set of Ph.D. geeks working on safety and on security,” said Shuler. “What’s disconcerting is that the effects of any of these things, especially from a functional safety standpoint and a security standpoint, can be the same. Whether a bit flips or an engineer flipped a bit, someone can get hurt. Yet these sets of experts don’t really talk to each other too much. This was addressed in the new ISO 26262 2018 specification that came out in December, which includes specific text to address this. It basically says you must coordinate with security guys, but unless security is somehow mandated to a certain level — like functional safety is in cars and trains and other verticals — nobody really cares. It’s like insurance. Nobody wants to pay for too much security.”

For more information about ISO 26262:2018 Part 11, please download this presentation "Fundamentals of ISO 26262 Part 11 for Semiconductors".

Topics: semiconductor automotive AI ISO PAS 21448 data centers noc interconnect ML AI SoC Designers ecosystem