Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Time For FMEDA Reuse?

Stefano Lorenzini, Fellow & Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP authored this Semiconductor Engineering article:

Time for FMEDA Reuse?

 July 7th, 2022 - By Stefano Lorenzini

Making it easier to integrate configurable IP into safety-critical systems.

How do designers quantify safety in electronic systems? Through one or more tables called Failure Modes, Effects and Diagnostic Analysis – FMEDA. In fact, an FMEDA does not have to be a table; it could be manifested in scripts or some other form, but a table is the easiest way to think of this information. Think of an FMEDA for an IP, as the concept extends easily to a system-on-chip (SoC). The table has a row for each failure mode that the IP experts can imagine might lead to a critical safety problem. Following identifying information for that failure mode is a description of the effect – the safety problem it might cause. Through fault simulation, the safety engineer determines the likelihood of the root cause problem leading to that effect. If the likelihood is significant, the designer will propose a mitigation technique, such as a parity check to detect the problem or an error-correcting code (ECC) check to correct it. A completed FMEDA then represents a comprehensive safety quality document for that IP, a characterization that an SoC integrator can use when determining the FMEDA for the whole design.

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Topics: IP System-on-Chip functional safety network-on-chip semiconductor engineering SoCs FMEDA scalability traceability Stefano Lorenzini NoCs Arteris IP (AIP)

Semiconductor Engineering: ISO 26262 - Law Or Framework?

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authors this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

ISO 26262 - Law or Framework?

August 9th, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

Collaboration between supplier and customer is key to achieving functional safety goals.


The ISO 26262 standard is a weighty series of documents that many believe has all the force of law or regulation; however, it is not a dictate. It is an agreement on best practices for participants in the vehicle value chain to follow to ensure safety as far as the industry understands it today. There is no monetary fine if the standard is not followed, though it will be difficult to sell automotive products without compliance.

Topics: functional safety automotive semiconductor engineering arteris ip SoCs kurt shuler eco FMEDA automotive chips IEEE P2851 ASIL automotive OEMs NoCs Accellera Functional Safety Working Group RTFM ISO 26262:2018 abstract

SemiWiki: The Zen of Auto Safety - a Path to Enlightenment

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing and Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP, share stories with Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) to help you chill. Safety is critical, but that’s doesn't mean you have to panic. 

The Zen of Auto-Safety - a Path to Enlightenment

July 7, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

Safety is a complex topic, but we’re busy. We take the course, get the certificate. Check, along with a million other things we need to do. But maybe it’s not quite that simple. I talked recently with Kurt Shuler (VP of marketing) and Stefano Lorenzini (functional safety manager) at Arteris IP and concluded that finding enlightenment in safety is more of a journey than a destination. I’m going to share with you a few stories they told me which highlight this journey. Because journeys / stories are my favorite way to share an idea.
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor automotive arteris ip semiwiki functional safety manager RTL FMEDA noc interconnect hybrid AI SoCs Tier 1s AI/ML AoU assumptions of use

Semiconductor Engineering: Learning ISO 26262 - 2nd Edition

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article on the interpretation of ISO 26262 in today's Semiconductor Engineering blog:

Learning ISO 26262 -2nd Edition 

December 7th, 2020 - By Kurt Shuler

Interpreting the functional safety standard isn't as simple as just looking at the document.

Ambiguity is a feature, not a bug!

Why? Partly ambiguity. Because what I think is clear, you may not think is clear. And some of this ambiguity is intentional: This is a voluntary (thought widely followed) standard, aiming to preserve flexibility for innovation and differentiation. The committees don't want to be too prescriptive, which inevitably leads to some ambiguity.

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety ISO 26262 automotive semiconductor engineering Soft IP FMEA kurt shuler OEMs FMEDA noc interconnect IP market Part 11 tailoring safety element standards SEooC