Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Software-Defined Vehicles

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Software-Defined Vehicles

September 4th, 2020 - By Bryon Moyer

The electrification of cars makes all sorts of things possible. 

“There’s a big open question regarding how these updates affect functional safety,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP . “Is it practical to completely redo the safety analysis for each update?”
 
Topics: SoC NoC functional safety ISO 26262 automotive ADAS NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture kurt shuler AI chips noc interconnect IP market

Arteris IP is Now Hiring a Corporate Application Engineer in Campbell, CA

This is a New Position!

Corporate Application Engineer in Campbell, CA

Now is the time to join Arteris IP!

Do you want to contribute to the backbone of some of the world’s most popular SoCs?

As a Corporate Application Engineer at Arteris, you will work with an expert team to support and deploy interconnect and memory hierarchy solutions for some of the world’s most sophisticated mobile, telecom, automotive, AI and consumer SoC designs.

Topics: software jobs functional safety ISO 26262 arteris ip noc interconnect job SoC designs leader IP design

Arteris IP Presents: Lessons Learned integrating AI/ML Accelerators into Complex ISO 26262 Compliant Systems-on-Chip

This presentation titled, "Lessons Learned integrating AI/ML Accelerators into Complex ISO 26262 Compliant Systems-on-Chip," presented by Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing and Functional Safety Manager (FSM) at Arteris IP, and Diego Botero, Functional Safety Engineer at Arteris IP, to an audience at the ISO 26262 for Semiconductors (Munich) Conference.

Topics: functional safety ISO 26262 Systems-on-Chip FlexNoC kurt shuler accelerators ML/AI automotive chips IQPC

Semiconductor Engineering: Planning For Failures In Automotive

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing, comments on Bigger Chips in this latest Semiconductor Engineering:

Planning For Failures In Automotive

November 7th, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

With more consolidation of functions within the ECUs in vehicles, the chips are getting bigger.

 In fact, they’re much larger and more sophisticated than
any chip in a cell phone, and have many more brains on it, noted Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “They’re more like something you would find in a data center, but it’s in your car. It’s got to sip power from a battery and it can’t have too much heat, so they’ve got all these different challenges. Then, if you look at the design teams that do this stuff, as design approaches change to anticipate failures, this is the reason why the traditional semiconductor companies are having trouble adapting — companies that have been incumbents and have done automotive chips for years.”

The ISO 26262 spec has been adapted to accommodate this in that fault injection can be done at a higher level than post synthesis, and can be run at the RTL functional level. “Still, getting some of the automotive guys to accept that this is acceptable is a challenge, but it’s progressing,” he added.

You can learn more by going to the Arteris IP Resources page and download presentations, technical papers, and view videos here; https://www.arteris.com/resources

Topics: SoC functional safety ISO 26262 semiconductor engineering AI kurt shuler noc interconnect SOTIF (ISO 21448 bigger chips