Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Industry Transforming In Ways Previously Unimaginable

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this Semiconductor Engineering article:

Industry Transforming In Ways Previously Unimaginable

December 30th, 2021 - By Brian Bailey

As we look back over 2021, there have certainly been some surprises, but the industry continues to take everything in stride.


“How are our customers doing?” asks Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “How many new design starts are being done by our customers? How many new customers are we getting? Your heart says innovation should be slower or stalling, but when I look at the numbers, when I look at the financials — not just for us, but for all of our customers, all of our partners — semiconductors continue to be in a huge upswing even though we’re going through this. Maybe it is partially because of this. Maybe that’s fueling demand.”

Topics: network-on-chip automotive semiconductor engineering AI arteris ip functional safety manager SoCs chiplets EDA 5G covid-19 NoCs Arteris IP (AIP) GSM CDMA

SemiWiki: The Zen of Auto Safety - a Path to Enlightenment

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing and Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP, share stories with Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) to help you chill. Safety is critical, but that’s doesn't mean you have to panic. 

The Zen of Auto-Safety - a Path to Enlightenment

July 7, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

Safety is a complex topic, but we’re busy. We take the course, get the certificate. Check, along with a million other things we need to do. But maybe it’s not quite that simple. I talked recently with Kurt Shuler (VP of marketing) and Stefano Lorenzini (functional safety manager) at Arteris IP and concluded that finding enlightenment in safety is more of a journey than a destination. I’m going to share with you a few stories they told me which highlight this journey. Because journeys / stories are my favorite way to share an idea.
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor automotive arteris ip semiwiki functional safety manager RTL FMEDA noc interconnect hybrid AI SoCs Tier 1s AI/ML AoU assumptions of use

SemiWiki: Architecture Wrinkles in Automotive AI: Unique Needs

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) learns from Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP, the difference between AI in automotive and other contexts. 

Architecture Wrinkles in Automotive AI: Unique Needs

May 20th, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

Arteris IP recently spoke at the Spring Linley Processor Conference on April 21, 2021 about Automotive systems-on-chips (SoCs) architecture with artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning (ML) and Functional Safety. Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP, presented a nice contrast between auto AI SoCs and those designed for datacenters. Never mind the cost or power, in a car we need to provide near real-time performance for sensing, recognition and actuation. For IoT applications we assume AI on a serious budget, power-sipping, running for 10 years on a coin cell battery. But that isn't the whole story. AI in the car is a sort of hybrid, with the added dimension of safety, which makes for unique architecture wrinkles in automotive AI.  
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor ECC The Linley Group FlexNoC arteris ip semiwiki functional safety manager kurt shuler data centers noc interconnect AI SoCs AI/ML automotive AI Hardware Stefano Lorenzini

Semiconductor Engineering: Virtualization In The Car

Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Virtualization In The Car

August 6th, 2020 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

How and why abstraction layers are becoming essential in automotive design.

 
“It’s a way to create multiple virtual instantiations of the same hardware, and every instance is virtually dedicated to a specific product or software or application,” said Stefano Lorenzini, functional safety manager at Arteris IP . “The hypervisor is a bare-metal operating system that runs directly on the hardware and creates an intermediate layer with respect to other application or software programs that are running on top. So if you want to look to the architecture from the top to the bottom, you see the application, then you see the hypervisor, and then you see the hardware layer. The hypervisor is the thing that creates this illusion to the application that every resource of the SoC is dedicated to them.”
 
Topics: SoC automotive autonomous vehicles NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture AI ASIL D functional safety manager noc interconnect IP market automotive electronics