Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: NoCs In Authoritative MPSoC Reference

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

NoCs In Authoritative MPSoC Reference

May 6th, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

The role of the network-on-chip in ensuring total system safety.

K. Charles Janac, president and CEO of Arteris IP, authored the first chapter in that third section on network-on-chip (NoC) architecture and how it has enabled MPSoCs. 

The chapter starts with the evolution from buses to crossbars to NoCs. Next is a useful overview of a typical approach to architecting and configuring a NoC. As the most configurable intellectual property (IP) in an SoC, getting the design to an optimal solution requires careful planning and refinement. The design evolves, not just the logic but also the topology.

By the way, this book is a technical review, not a marketing pitch. Charlie is quite open that while NoCs share some concepts with “regular” communications networks, the analogy cannot be stretched too far. NoC design is still very much an activity for semiconductor designers, not general network designers.

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety network-on-chip ECC cache coherency IEEE semiconductor engineering arteris ip ASIL D K. Charles Janac interconnects kurt shuler ai accelerators security TMR MPSOC LBIST

Semiconductor Engineering: Privacy Protection A Must For Driver Monitoring

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Privacy Protection A Must For Driver Monitoring 

April 1st, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Why driver data collected by in-cabin monitoring systems must be included as part of the overall security system.

Privacy and security has to be addressed at every layer, by all parties, said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “We’re getting questions from customers asking, ‘You’ve got this interconnect, it’s a network, you have these firewalls, how do I integrate this into my overall security system for my chip?’ They also want to know how to integrate that in the overall security system of that vehicle subsystem, and how to integrate that into the overall security system for the car, and then the network of cars. If I’m GM, I’ve got a whole network of GM cars running around. Where there’s OnStar, I have to protect that data too, and that’s sitting on servers. The OEM is cognizant of this because they know from market forces that if they screw it up, then people aren’t going to trust them. And even though there are IEEE, ISO, and SAE standards, selling security is like selling insurance. Nobody thinks they need it until after the incident happened. The risk is huge here if you don’t do it right, so you should do everything state of the art. However, there’s nothing currently legally forcing that.”

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety ISO 26262 network-on-chip automotive IEEE semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects OEMs security driver monitoring