Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: SoC Integration Complexity: Size Doesn't (Always) Matter

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

SoC Integration Complexity: Size Doesn't (Always) Matter

April 1st, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

Even small IoT designs can have plenty of complexity in architecture and integration.

It’s common when talking about complexity in systems-on-chip (SoCs) to haul out monster examples: application processors, giant AI chips, and the like. Breaking with that tradition, consider an internet of things (IoT) design, which can still challenge engineers with plenty of complexity in architecture and integration. This complexity springs from two drivers: very low power consumption, even using harvested MEMS power instead of a battery, and quick turnaround to build out a huge family of products based on a common SoC platform while keeping tight control on development and unit costs.

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip IoT low power semiconductor engineering arteris ip ip-xact interconnects kurt shuler DVFS ip deployment

SemiWiki: SoC Integration - Predictable, Repeatable, Scalable

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) gets an update from Kurt Shuler, vice president of Marketing at Arteris IP on the benefits of integrating SoC data and NoC integration. 

SoC Integration - Predictable, Repeatable, Scalable

March 24th, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

On its face System-on-chip (SoC) integration doesn’t seem so hard. You gather and configure all the intellectual properties (IPs) you’re going to need, then stitch them together. Something you could delegate to new college hires, maybe? But it isn’t that simple. What makes SoC integration challenging is that there are so many parts including IPs and connections. Some are moving parts, changing as bugs are fixed. Some, like the interconnect, can only be completely defined when you integrate. There’s a lot of interdependence between these parts. Make a small change like importing a new revision of an IP or adapting to a spec tweak, and the consequences can ripple through your integration, not a big deal, perhaps, early in design. But a very big deal when you’ve finally wrestled hundreds of IPs and tens of thousands of connections into behaving. Then you have to drop in a couple more changes. Surely there’s a better way? Kurt Shuler shares his views on the need.
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor FlexNoC semiwiki safety XML ip-xact magillem kurt shuler QoS noc interconnect EDA data integration traceability configuration software interface documentation enterprise

SemiWiki: Arteris IP Folds in Magillem

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) gets an update from Kurt Shuler, vice president of Marketing at Arteris IP on the motivation behind the Arteris IP/Magillem merger.

Arteris IP Folds in Magillem. Perfect for SoC Integrators

February 18, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

Arteris IP and Magillem recently tied the knot, creating a merger of Network-on-Chip (NoC) and related Intellectual Property (IP) with a platform known for IP-XACT based SoC integration and related support. This is interesting to me because I’m familiar with products and people in both companies. I talked to Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing to understand the rationale behind the acquisition.
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor FlexNoC semiwiki ip-xact kurt shuler QoS noc interconnect Magillem Deployment Division

Semiconductor Engineering: An Acquisition To Streamline SoC Integration

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

An Acquisition To Streamline SoC Integration

February 16th, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

Bringing order to the potential chaos of trying to combine IP from multiple suppliers.


Late last year Arteris IP closed its acquisition of Magillem assets, bringing together two companies with a single mission: To support integration of systems-on-chip (SoCs) at the interconnect fabric level and the data integration level. The value of joining forces has been appealing for some time. Since the early days of both companies, we’ve been working with mutual customers and integration teams within those customers. It’s not surprising that needs and goals look similar across all of those teams: High performance, low power and low impact communication across the SoC, efficiently integrating IPs from multiple suppliers, each configured correctly to that communication backbone. And all in as little schedule time as possible. Combining forces just made sense.

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor engineering arteris ip ip-xact kurt shuler Magillem Design Services IP Deployment Division IPDD SoC integration quality of service