Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: New Design Approaches For Automotive

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

New Design Approaches For Automotive

July 1st, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

OEMs steer toward executable specs using model-based systems engineering.


“If you’re creating an anti-lock braking system or a windshield washer or something like that, it’s relatively simple and you don’t have to spend much time with these tools to be able to come up with that model,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “But once you get to something really complex like a system on chip — just like with creating SystemC models or the like — you could spend more time than you would on the RTL, or on writing the specs for the RTL, the requirements and use cases for the specs for the RTL, or a SysML model.”

Topics: SoC NoC ISO 26262 ArterisIP SystemC semiconductor engineering arteris ip RTL kurt shuler SoC assembly SysML MBSE

SemiWiki: Arteris IP Contributes to Major MPSoC Text

Bernard Murphy of (SemiWiki) comments on a recent book release on MPSoC design. 

Arteris IP Contributes to Major MPSoC Text

April 29th, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

You might have heard of the Multicore and Multiprocessor SoC (MPSoC) Forum sponsored by IEEE and other industry associations and companies. This group of top-notch academic and industry technical leaders gets together once a year to talk about hardware and software architecture and applications for multicore and multiprocessor systems-on-chip (SoCs). They gather to debate the latest and greatest ideas to meet emerging needs.
 
K. Charles Janac, president and CEO of Arteris IP, wrote the first chapter in the third section on network-on-chip (NoC) architectures. I’m impressed that what must be considered a definitive technical reference on MPSoCs required a chapter on NoC interconnect, and the editors turned to Arteris IP to write that chapter.
Topics: SoC NoC ISO 26262 network-on-chip semiconductor AI semiwiki K. Charles Janac kurt shuler noc interconnect cache coherence MPSoC Forum

Semiconductor Engineering: Privacy Protection A Must For Driver Monitoring

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

Privacy Protection A Must For Driver Monitoring 

April 1st, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Why driver data collected by in-cabin monitoring systems must be included as part of the overall security system.

Privacy and security has to be addressed at every layer, by all parties, said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “We’re getting questions from customers asking, ‘You’ve got this interconnect, it’s a network, you have these firewalls, how do I integrate this into my overall security system for my chip?’ They also want to know how to integrate that in the overall security system of that vehicle subsystem, and how to integrate that into the overall security system for the car, and then the network of cars. If I’m GM, I’ve got a whole network of GM cars running around. Where there’s OnStar, I have to protect that data too, and that’s sitting on servers. The OEM is cognizant of this because they know from market forces that if they screw it up, then people aren’t going to trust them. And even though there are IEEE, ISO, and SAE standards, selling security is like selling insurance. Nobody thinks they need it until after the incident happened. The risk is huge here if you don’t do it right, so you should do everything state of the art. However, there’s nothing currently legally forcing that.”

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety ISO 26262 network-on-chip automotive IEEE semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects OEMs security driver monitoring

Semiconductor Engineering: Learning ISO 26262 - 2nd Edition

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article on the interpretation of ISO 26262 in today's Semiconductor Engineering blog:

Learning ISO 26262 -2nd Edition 

December 7th, 2020 - By Kurt Shuler

Interpreting the functional safety standard isn't as simple as just looking at the document.

Ambiguity is a feature, not a bug!

Why? Partly ambiguity. Because what I think is clear, you may not think is clear. And some of this ambiguity is intentional: This is a voluntary (thought widely followed) standard, aiming to preserve flexibility for innovation and differentiation. The committees don't want to be too prescriptive, which inevitably leads to some ambiguity.

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety ISO 26262 automotive semiconductor engineering Soft IP FMEA kurt shuler OEMs FMEDA noc interconnect IP market Part 11 tailoring safety element standards SEooC