Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: New Design Approaches For Automotive

Kurt Shuler, VP of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

New Design Approaches For Automotive

July 1st, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

OEMs steer toward executable specs using model-based systems engineering.


“If you’re creating an anti-lock braking system or a windshield washer or something like that, it’s relatively simple and you don’t have to spend much time with these tools to be able to come up with that model,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “But once you get to something really complex like a system on chip — just like with creating SystemC models or the like — you could spend more time than you would on the RTL, or on writing the specs for the RTL, the requirements and use cases for the specs for the RTL, or a SysML model.”

Topics: SoC NoC ISO 26262 ArterisIP SystemC semiconductor engineering arteris ip RTL kurt shuler SoC assembly SysML MBSE

Semiconductor Engineering: Automotive AI Hardware: A New Breed

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Automotive AI Hardware: A New Breed

June 3rd, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

What sets automotive apart from the conventional wisdom on AI hardware markets.

Arteris IP functional safety manager Stefano Lorenzini recently presented “Automotive Systems-on-Chip (SoCs) with AI/ML and Functional Safety” at the Linley Processor Conference. A main point of the presentation was that conventional wisdom on AI hardware markets is binary. There’s AI in the cloud: Big, power-hungry, general-purpose. And there’s AI at the edge: Small, low power, limited application-specific features. Automotive AI doesn’t really fit into either category. To power ADAS and autonomous driving functions, these chips are extremely application-specific and require more performance than typical edge AI, are low power but not as low as IoT chips at the edge, and must be as low cost as possible. They also add a new angle – low latency because safety demands fast and deterministic response times. Add to all that the functional safety requirements demanded by ISO 26262 – inside the AI structure as much as everywhere else. Bottom line: Automotive AI SoC architectures are unique beasts.

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety network-on-chip automotive ECC The Linley Group ISO 26262 compliance semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects kurt shuler AI SoCs AI/ML Stefano Lorenzini heterogeneous socs ASIL

SemiWiki: Architecture Wrinkles in Automotive AI: Unique Needs

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) learns from Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP, the difference between AI in automotive and other contexts. 

Architecture Wrinkles in Automotive AI: Unique Needs

May 20th, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

Arteris IP recently spoke at the Spring Linley Processor Conference on April 21, 2021 about Automotive systems-on-chips (SoCs) architecture with artificial intelligence (AI)/machine learning (ML) and Functional Safety. Stefano Lorenzini, Functional Safety Manager at Arteris IP, presented a nice contrast between auto AI SoCs and those designed for datacenters. Never mind the cost or power, in a car we need to provide near real-time performance for sensing, recognition and actuation. For IoT applications we assume AI on a serious budget, power-sipping, running for 10 years on a coin cell battery. But that isn't the whole story. AI in the car is a sort of hybrid, with the added dimension of safety, which makes for unique architecture wrinkles in automotive AI.  
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor ECC The Linley Group FlexNoC arteris ip semiwiki functional safety manager kurt shuler data centers noc interconnect AI SoCs AI/ML automotive AI Hardware Stefano Lorenzini

Semiconductor Engineering: NoCs In Authoritative MPSoC Reference

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

NoCs In Authoritative MPSoC Reference

May 6th, 2021 - By Kurt Shuler

The role of the network-on-chip in ensuring total system safety.

K. Charles Janac, president and CEO of Arteris IP, authored the first chapter in that third section on network-on-chip (NoC) architecture and how it has enabled MPSoCs. 

The chapter starts with the evolution from buses to crossbars to NoCs. Next is a useful overview of a typical approach to architecting and configuring a NoC. As the most configurable intellectual property (IP) in an SoC, getting the design to an optimal solution requires careful planning and refinement. The design evolves, not just the logic but also the topology.

By the way, this book is a technical review, not a marketing pitch. Charlie is quite open that while NoCs share some concepts with “regular” communications networks, the analogy cannot be stretched too far. NoC design is still very much an activity for semiconductor designers, not general network designers.

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety network-on-chip ECC cache coherency IEEE semiconductor engineering arteris ip ASIL D K. Charles Janac interconnects kurt shuler ai accelerators security TMR MPSOC LBIST