Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Sensor Fusion Challenges In Cars

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Sensor Fusion Challenges In Cars

October 8th, 2020 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

As more pieces of the autonomous vehicle puzzle come into view, the enormity of the challenge grows.

You could say it’s the Wild West, but you could also say there’s tons of innovation happening,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “That’s true whether it’s on the sensor chips or whether it’s on the ADAS brain chips. Eventually you want to be able to explain things in symbolic terms, and have an intermediate layer such that once you get this data, the data as its transmitted is in some kind of lingua franca that both sides can understand even though they’re from two separate companies. What I don’t know is how much processing it will take to move something from more of a raw data format into something useful. Eventually, there has to be a data format.”

Topics: SoC NoC automotive ADAS autonomous vehicles radar semiconductor engineering soc architecture LIDAR interconnects kurt shuler noc interconnect data ML/AI IP market

Semiconductor Engineering: Get Ready For Dynamic Extensibility

Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP comments in this new  Semiconductor Engineering article:

Data Strategy Shifting Again In Cars

June 8th, 2020 - By Brian Bailey

How late can something be deferred during the development process? With dynamically extensible processors, that may be while it's operating.  
 
This places additional burdens on the algorithms. “They need something that’s much more specific for the problem they’re trying to solve, such as near real-time vision, while probably mixing that with other sensors like LiDAR and radar,” says Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “It’s not as general-purpose as something that you’d see from the more academic benchmark. So those guys are having to innovate a lot more than the traditional AI algorithms that you read about.”
 
Topics: SoC automotive ADAS NoC technology semiconductor engineering safety LIDAR kurt shuler accelerators noc interconnect IP market data flow management

Semiconductor Engineering: Where Should Auto Sensor Data Be Processed?

 Arteris IP's Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing, comments in this latest Semiconductor Engineering article:

Where Should Auto Sensor Data Be Processed?

August 1st, 2019 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Fully autonomous vehicles are coming, but not as quickly as the initial hype would suggest...

 

Indeed, when it comes to processing the sensor data, a number of approaches currently point to allowing for scaling between different ADAS levels, but which the best way to do that is still up for debate.

“There must be an architecture they can do that with, and the question is, ‘How do you do that?'” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “There’s a lot of interest in getting more hardware accelerators to manage the communications in software, and directly managing the memory. For this, cache coherence is growing in importance. But how do you scale a cache coherent system? This must be done in an organized way, as well as adding a whole bunch of masters and slaves to it, such as additional clusters.”

For more information, please download the Arteris FlexNoC Interconnect IP data sheet; https://www.arteris.com/download-flexnoc-datasheet

Topics: SoC autonomous driving ArterisIP FlexNoC semiconductor engineering LIDAR noc interconnect cache coherence hardware accelerators

Semiconductor Engineering: The Race To Multi-Domain SoCs

 Arteris IP's CEO looks at how automotive and AI are Altering chip design in this article in Semiconductor Engineering;

The Race To Multi-Domain SoCs

February 7th,  2019 - By Ed Sperling

K. Charles Janac, president and CEO of Arteris IP, sat
down with Semiconductor Engineering to discuss the impact of automotive and AI on chip design. What follows are excerpts of that conversation.

SE: What do you see as the biggest changes over the next 12 to 24 months?
Janac: There are segments of the semiconductor market that are shrinking, such as DTV and simple IoT. Others are going through an investment phase, including automotive, AI/machine learning and China. You really want to be focused on those segments. 

SE: So does IP that’s being developed today look radically different than it did five years ago?
Janac:
Yes, everything is getting amazingly complex. What people are building right now are multi-domain SoCs. The CPU, which used to do all the work, does relatively less work. There are accelerators for vision and data analysis outside of the CPU subsystem. There are machine learning sections, some general-purpose, some very specific, all on-chip. There is a memory subsystem with very high-bandwidth memory and low latency. There also is functional safety. You need tremendous performance because a car is a supercomputer on wheels. The car has to be very efficient, because you need to deliver that compute power without water cooling. Power management becomes very sophisticated. And then there are functional safety and security subsystems to keep these safe from environmental and man-made issues.

SE: Where does the network on chip (NoC) fit into all of this?
Janac: All data goes through the NoC of the chip. There are opportunities for generating value from that. But the increase in complexity is increasing the number and sophistication of the interconnect parts of the chip. Before, you may have had networks on chip. Now you may have 20 or 30.

Topics: semiconductor automotive ADAS neural networks AI LIDAR flexnoc ai package noc interconnect ML AI SoC Designers chiplets