Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Shifting Toward Data-Driven Chip Architectures

K. Charles Janac, CEO at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Shifting Toward Data-Driven Chip Architectures

June 16th, 2021 - By Ed Sperling and Ann Steffora Mutschler

Rethinking how to improve performance and lower power in semiconductors.

“There are dynamic routing opportunities at runtime,” said K. Charles Janac, chairman and CEO of Arteris IP. “We’ve always resisted runtime dynamic routing because there are issues with verification. If you have billions of transactions, the verification is much simpler if you’re forcing the traffic to go onto a single connection every time. But there are opportunities for easing that in the future and have the NoC essentially be able to reroute traffic dynamically based on some sort of routing controller, which in turn is controlled by some global software."

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip automotive machine learning semiconductor engineering arteris ip verification K. Charles Janac interconnects datacenters

Semiconductor Engineering: Power Optimization: What's Next?

Guillaume Boillet, Director of Product Management at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Power Optimization: What's Next!

May 17th, 2021 - By Brian Bailey

Clock gating and power gating were a good start, but there is much more that can and should be done to minimize power.

“The efforts in terms of methodology, compute resources and engineering talent to deploy system-level techniques are definitely non-negligible,” says Guillaume Boillet, director of product management for Arteris IP. “Only the most advanced and power-savvy design teams invest in those.”

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip dynamic power machine learning semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects RTL Guillaume Boillet clock-gating macro-level

Semiconductor Engineering: HBM Takes On A Much Bigger Role

Michael Frank, Fellow and System Architect at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

HBM Takes On A Much Bigger Role

May 13th, 2021 - By Brian Bailey

High-bandwidth memory may be a significant gateway technology that allows the industry to make a controlled transition to true 3D design and assembly.

“The benefit of HBM is really its high bandwidth,” says Michael Frank, fellow and system architect at Arteris IP. “If you have a working data set that fits, it’s fine. To consume that much bandwidth, you are likely to use a decent amount of silicon area to process it. But HBM does not providing the low latency that you get from SRAMs. You have to look at your application. What is your algorithm? In many systems, you sequentially process a lot of data, mostly with the same kind of processing scheme. It’s like SIMD or streaming. Machine learning is typically something like this, where you have large data sets and weights. But HBM is still limited in capacity, and the price is relatively high.”

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip machine learning semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects Michael Frank DRAMS SMID

Semiconductor Engineering: More Data Drives Focus On IC Energy Efficiency

Michael Frank, fellow and system architect at Arteris IP are quoted in this new Semiconductor Engineering article:

More Data Drives Focus On IC Energy Efficiency

April 8th, 2021 - By Ann Steffora Mutschler

Decisions that affect how, when, and where data gets processed.

"On the chip side, it’s an engineering discipline. On the other side are the algorithm experts who understand what the masks are and what they want to do,” said Michael Frank, fellow and system architect at Arteris IP.

Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip machine learning neural networks semiconductor engineering arteris ip interconnects chiplets Michael Frank memory architecture TensorFlow