Arteris Articles

SemiWiki: SoC Integration - Predictable, Repeatable, Scalable

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) gets an update from Kurt Shuler, vice president of Marketing at Arteris IP on the benefits of integrating SoC data and NoC integration. 

SoC Integration - Predictable, Repeatable, Scalable

March 24th, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

On its face System-on-chip (SoC) integration doesn’t seem so hard. You gather and configure all the intellectual properties (IPs) you’re going to need, then stitch them together. Something you could delegate to new college hires, maybe? But it isn’t that simple. What makes SoC integration challenging is that there are so many parts including IPs and connections. Some are moving parts, changing as bugs are fixed. Some, like the interconnect, can only be completely defined when you integrate. There’s a lot of interdependence between these parts. Make a small change like importing a new revision of an IP or adapting to a spec tweak, and the consequences can ripple through your integration, not a big deal, perhaps, early in design. But a very big deal when you’ve finally wrestled hundreds of IPs and tens of thousands of connections into behaving. Then you have to drop in a couple more changes. Surely there’s a better way? Kurt Shuler shares his views on the need.
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor FlexNoC semiwiki safety XML ip-xact magillem kurt shuler QoS noc interconnect EDA data integration traceability configuration software interface documentation enterprise

EE Times article, "Licensing Interconnect IP for Fun & Profit"

Kurt Shuler, VP Marketing at Arteris IP, authored this EE Times article discussing NoC interconnect Build or Buy.

February 25, 2021 - by Kurt Shuler

Why do we buy instead of build? Because the guys at the factory know what they’re doing.

The big question then becomes, which parts do we design in-house, and which do we bring in from outside? That’s a whiteboard architectural discussion, which can be heated and emotional. Engineers want to build stuff — that’s what they do. Managers want to get a working product out the door as economically as possible — that’s what they do. If the engineers want to make, and the managers want to buy, who wins? Who gets to make that call, and how do they justify the decision? 

Topics: SoC economics semiconductor eetimes AI SoCs RTL kurt shuler noc interconnect ML/AI SoC IP R&D costs buy vs build build vs buy

SemiWiki: Arteris IP Folds in Magillem

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) gets an update from Kurt Shuler, vice president of Marketing at Arteris IP on the motivation behind the Arteris IP/Magillem merger.

Arteris IP Folds in Magillem. Perfect for SoC Integrators

February 18, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

Arteris IP and Magillem recently tied the knot, creating a merger of Network-on-Chip (NoC) and related Intellectual Property (IP) with a platform known for IP-XACT based SoC integration and related support. This is interesting to me because I’m familiar with products and people in both companies. I talked to Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing to understand the rationale behind the acquisition.
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor FlexNoC semiwiki ip-xact kurt shuler QoS noc interconnect Magillem Deployment Division

Semiconductor Engineering: Learning ISO 26262 - 2nd Edition

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP authored this new article on the interpretation of ISO 26262 in today's Semiconductor Engineering blog:

Learning ISO 26262 -2nd Edition 

December 7th, 2020 - By Kurt Shuler

Interpreting the functional safety standard isn't as simple as just looking at the document.

Ambiguity is a feature, not a bug!

Why? Partly ambiguity. Because what I think is clear, you may not think is clear. And some of this ambiguity is intentional: This is a voluntary (thought widely followed) standard, aiming to preserve flexibility for innovation and differentiation. The committees don't want to be too prescriptive, which inevitably leads to some ambiguity.

Topics: SoC NoC functional safety ISO 26262 automotive semiconductor engineering Soft IP FMEA kurt shuler OEMs FMEDA noc interconnect IP market Part 11 tailoring safety element standards SEooC