Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: Software-Defined Vehicles

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Software-Defined Vehicles

September 4th, 2020 - By Bryon Moyer

The electrification of cars makes all sorts of things possible. 

“There’s a big open question regarding how these updates affect functional safety,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP . “Is it practical to completely redo the safety analysis for each update?”
 
Topics: SoC NoC functional safety ISO 26262 automotive ADAS NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture kurt shuler AI chips noc interconnect IP market

Semiconductor Engineering: Interconnects Emerge As Key Concern For Performance

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

Interconnects Emerge As Key Concern For Performance

September 3rd, 2020 - By Ed Sperling

Complexity, abundant options, and limits on tooling make this an increasingly challenging area. 

“On the AI side of things, the architecture is being determined by the capabilities of the interconnect,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP . “It’s not just about the individual processing elements. It’s how do you get data between the processing elements and a whole bunch of local memories. In a lot of these AI chips, for power as well as latency and bandwidth, they want to limit as much as possible going off to DRAM, which means you’ve got to do the processing in situ within the chip. You can think of the interconnect as knobs and dials of what you’re capable of doing within these huge AI chips.”
 
Topics: SoC NoC NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture DRAM AI chips noc interconnect IP market

Semiconductor Engineering: What Happened To Execute-In-Place?

Michael Frank, Fellow and Chief Architect at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

What Happened To Execute-In-Place?

August 25th, 2020 - By Bryon Moyer

The concept as it was originally conceived no longer applies. Here’s why.

“Demand-paging virtual memory is nothing else than a cache,” noted Michael Frank, fellow and chief architect at Arteris IP . But then Android came available for free, unlike the planned OSes. So the strategy changed from one of demand-paging to moving the entire code base from flash to DRAM, and then using the SRAM cache mechanism to further manage instruction access times — all in the interest of lower cost.
 
Frank also stated, “My definition of execute in place is where you do not have an address change, where you execute in a cached way, and your original source of the code or the data is still at the same address that you are executing at.”
 
Topics: SoC NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture AI cache DRAM noc interconnect IP market SRAM MCUs

Semiconductor Engineering: From Cloud To Cloudlets

Kurt Shuler, Vice President of Marketing at Arteris IP is quoted in this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

From Cloud To Cloudlets

August 17th, 2020 - By Ed Sperling

Why the intersection of 5G and the edge is driving a new compute model.

 
In the U.S., they’re using the higher S band, which is used for things like radar,” said Kurt Shuler, vice president of marketing at Arteris IP. “In other parts of the world, they’re using much lower frequency bands, which is more useful. It could replace or augment what they already have on a cell phone. So in the United States, the use cases are largely around things like factories and automotive. Overseas, that’s much different.
 
One such use case involves industrial robots, Shuler said, where microcell chipsets are used to control and monitor the activities of those robots. Most of those are fixed robots, but response time is critical.
 
Topics: SoC automotive NoC technology semiconductor engineering soc architecture bandwidth kurt shuler noc interconnect chipsets 5G IP market communications industrial robots