Arteris Articles

Semiconductor Engineering: IP-XACT Is Back, For All The Right Reasons

Vincent Thibaut, Director of IP Deployment Product Strategy at Arteris IP authored this new article in Semiconductor Engineering:

IP-XACT Is Back, For All The Right Reasons

July 1st, 2021 - By Vincent Thibaut

Providing collaborating teams a single and reliable source of truth for the design.

The intent behind IP-XACT has always been to provide a bridge between system-on-chip (SoC) assembly and larger considerations. This standard has additionally been used to adapt to multi-sourced and constantly evolving intellectual property (IP) that design and product teams build, often in different companies. Moreover, it was used to interface with product development beyond the specialized needs of logic design. Admittedly, it was developed early, offering a solution to a problem not yet widely recognized. It was early, but it was not wrong. Market changes are pushing more and more SoC builders in this direction in mature and emerging semiconductor and systems companies. Production needs are finally catching up with this standard.

Topics: SoC ArterisIP semiconductor engineering arteris ip ip-xact SoC assembly Tier 1s IP Deployment Division traceability hyperscalers APIs IP licenses cloud compute resources compute farm resources

SemiWiki: SoC Integration - Predictable, Repeatable, Scalable

Bernard Murphy (SemiWiki) gets an update from Kurt Shuler, vice president of Marketing at Arteris IP on the benefits of integrating SoC data and NoC integration. 

SoC Integration - Predictable, Repeatable, Scalable

March 24th, 2021 - Bernard Murphy

On its face System-on-chip (SoC) integration doesn’t seem so hard. You gather and configure all the intellectual properties (IPs) you’re going to need, then stitch them together. Something you could delegate to new college hires, maybe? But it isn’t that simple. What makes SoC integration challenging is that there are so many parts including IPs and connections. Some are moving parts, changing as bugs are fixed. Some, like the interconnect, can only be completely defined when you integrate. There’s a lot of interdependence between these parts. Make a small change like importing a new revision of an IP or adapting to a spec tweak, and the consequences can ripple through your integration, not a big deal, perhaps, early in design. But a very big deal when you’ve finally wrestled hundreds of IPs and tens of thousands of connections into behaving. Then you have to drop in a couple more changes. Surely there’s a better way? Kurt Shuler shares his views on the need.
Topics: SoC NoC network-on-chip semiconductor FlexNoC semiwiki safety XML ip-xact magillem kurt shuler QoS noc interconnect EDA data integration traceability configuration software interface documentation enterprise